A Dictionary of American History

Contents:
Author: Thomas L. Purvis  | Date: 1995

Eaton [,Peggy,] Affair

Eaton [,Peggy,] Affair In 1829 Andrew Jackson’s administration became polarized when the wives of his cabinet, led by Mrs John Calhoun, snubbed Peggy O’Neale Eaton, wife of Secretary of War John Eaton. Peggy was considered unfit company because of rumors that her previous husband had committed suicide on account of an adulterous affair between her and Eaton. Jackson sympathized with Peggy and took her side, and so this minor disagreement played a major role in alienating him from Calhoun and improving his relationship with Secretary of State Martin van Buren, who was a bachelor and showed much solicitude toward Mrs Eaton. Jackson reorganized his cabinet in April 1831.

Contents:

Related Resources

None available for this document.

Download Options


Title: A Dictionary of American History

Select an option:

*Note: A download may not start for up to 60 seconds.

Email Options


Title: A Dictionary of American History

Select an option:

Email addres:

*Note: It may take up to 60 seconds for for the email to be generated.

Chicago: Thomas L. Purvis, "Eaton [,Peggy,] Affair," A Dictionary of American History in A Dictionary of American History (Cambridge, Mass.: Blackwell Reference, 1995), Original Sources, accessed September 18, 2018, http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=CK43GQ9V6TX9XQP.

MLA: Purvis, Thomas L. "Eaton [,Peggy,] Affair." A Dictionary of American History, in A Dictionary of American History, Cambridge, Mass., Blackwell Reference, 1995, Original Sources. 18 Sep. 2018. www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=CK43GQ9V6TX9XQP.

Harvard: Purvis, TL, 'Eaton [,Peggy,] Affair' in A Dictionary of American History. cited in 1995, A Dictionary of American History, Blackwell Reference, Cambridge, Mass.. Original Sources, retrieved 18 September 2018, from http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=CK43GQ9V6TX9XQP.