A Dictionary of American History

Contents:
Author: Thomas L. Purvis  | Date: 1995

Nootka Sound Crisis

Nootka Sound Crisis In 1789 the Spanish navy arrested British fur traders occupying a post on Nootka Sound, British Columbia, which was claimed by Spain. When Britain hinted at war in an ultimatum, George Washington chaired the federal government’s first cabinet debate on whether to resist British forces crossing the US to attack Spanish La. The crisis passed, but left Spanish officials worried that the US might allow British forces to march across its soil for an invasion. This apprehension motivated Spain to make generous concessions to the US in the treaty of San Lorenzo, as a means of forestalling any Anglo-American military cooperation against La.

Contents:

Related Resources

None available for this document.

Download Options


Title: A Dictionary of American History

Select an option:

*Note: A download may not start for up to 60 seconds.

Email Options


Title: A Dictionary of American History

Select an option:

Email addres:

*Note: It may take up to 60 seconds for for the email to be generated.

Chicago: Thomas L. Purvis, "Nootka Sound Crisis," A Dictionary of American History in A Dictionary of American History (Cambridge, Mass.: Blackwell Reference, 1995), Original Sources, accessed September 21, 2018, http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=CKHKCB8YC3SS1TH.

MLA: Purvis, Thomas L. "Nootka Sound Crisis." A Dictionary of American History, in A Dictionary of American History, Cambridge, Mass., Blackwell Reference, 1995, Original Sources. 21 Sep. 2018. www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=CKHKCB8YC3SS1TH.

Harvard: Purvis, TL, 'Nootka Sound Crisis' in A Dictionary of American History. cited in 1995, A Dictionary of American History, Blackwell Reference, Cambridge, Mass.. Original Sources, retrieved 21 September 2018, from http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=CKHKCB8YC3SS1TH.