A Dictionary of American History

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Author: Thomas L. Purvis  | Date: 1995

Congress of Racial Equality

Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) James Farmer founded CORE in June 1942 at the University of Chicago. CORE became nationally prominent in the civil rights movement by pioneering important tactics of nonviolent civil disobedience, especially the sit-in movement and freedom riders. After its Baltimore convention of 1–4 July 1966 endorsed the black power movement, CORE lost much of the financial support from whites on which it depended, and by 1979 was bankrupt.

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Chicago: Thomas L. Purvis, "Congress of Racial Equality," A Dictionary of American History in A Dictionary of American History (Cambridge, Mass.: Blackwell Reference, 1995), Original Sources, accessed September 25, 2018, http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=CMJT66TXQT5A1B7.

MLA: Purvis, Thomas L. "Congress of Racial Equality." A Dictionary of American History, in A Dictionary of American History, Cambridge, Mass., Blackwell Reference, 1995, Original Sources. 25 Sep. 2018. www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=CMJT66TXQT5A1B7.

Harvard: Purvis, TL, 'Congress of Racial Equality' in A Dictionary of American History. cited in 1995, A Dictionary of American History, Blackwell Reference, Cambridge, Mass.. Original Sources, retrieved 25 September 2018, from http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=CMJT66TXQT5A1B7.