A Guide to the Study of the United States of America - Supplement

Contents:

F. Representative Leaders

2451. [Ballou] Cassara, Ernest. Hosea Ballou; the challenge to orthodoxy. Boston, Universalist Historical Society [1961] 226 p. 61–6545 BX9969.B3C3. Bibliography: p. 177–190.

Universalism was a product of the revolt of New England’s lower classes against Calvinist orthodoxy. Its central idea of universal salvation first appeared in the American Colonies with the arrival of John Murray in New Jersey in 1770. Universalism spread slowly at first but gained impetus after the conversion, in 1789, of Hosea Ballou (1771–1852) from Baptist Calvinism. Ballou possessed little formal education, but his rough eloquence made him the leading Universalist minister. In A Treatise on the Atonement, mentioned in the annotation for no. 5473 in the 1960 Guide, he introduced the Unitarian ideas which were gradually accepted by the Universalist congregations. This biography analyzes his theology and supplies an extensive list of his publications.

2452. [Graham] High, Stanley. Billy Graham; the personal story of the man, his message, and his mission. New York, McGraw-Hill [1956] 274 p. 56–11952 BV3785.G69H5

2453. McLoughlin, William G. Billy Graham; revivalist in a secular age. New York, Ronald Press [1960] 269 p. 59–12122 BV3785.G69M3

High, a senior editor of The Reader’s Digest, was assigned to interview Graham in 1954, and his account is the result of the interest and admiration he developed at that time. Written in a popular style and at the height of the Graham crusades, this biography reflects the cooperation accorded the author by Graham’s family and associates and includes excerpts from letters and personal anecdotes. McLoughlin’s volume, published four years later, is a critical analysis. The author, associate professor of history at Brown University, describes the evangelist’s career and examines his theological, social, and political ideas, his pulpit techniques, the mechanics of his campaigns, and the commercialism surrounding his activities. McLoughlin has attempted to present all sides in his investigation, although his views are unsympathetic to Graham’s ideas and to revivalism in general.

2454. [Ingersoll] Larson, Orvin P. American infidel: Robert G. Ingersoll, a biography. New York, Citadel Press [1962] 316 p. illus. 62–10223 BL2790. I6L3. Bibliography: p. 286–290.

Ingersoll (1833–1899), one of the finest orators of the 19th century, was an apostle of antireligion. Inveighing against the Bible, organized religion, and the clergy, he spoke to packed houses all over the country on such topics as "Some Mistakes of Moses," "Myth and Miracle," and "About the Holy Bible." His ideas derived from a passionate belief in freedom of thought, and he was active in political affairs, supporting such causes as votes for women and the abolition of obscenity laws. The interest of his biographer, chairman of the department of speech at Brooklyn College, centers on Ingersoll the orator, but nevertheless a picture emerges of a manwho, while attacking religious beliefs and organizations, helped to promote an atmosphere conducive to critical research and thought. A general analysis of the influence of atheistic, agnostic, deistic, and theistic thought is made by Martin E. Marty in The Infidel; Freethought and American Religion (Cleveland, Meridian Books [1961] 224 p. Living age books, LA34).

2455. [Jones] Vining, Elizabeth Gray. Friend of life; the biography of Rufus M. Jones. Philadelphia, Lippincott [1958] 347 p. illus. 58–11131 BX7795.J55V5

"Books by Rufus M. Jones": p. 331–333.

Jones (1863–1948), sometimes called the modern spiritual leader of Quakerism, combined a life oriented toward intellectual pursuits with one of active service in organized Quaker philanthropy. He published more than 40 books on Quaker philosophy and history and served for many years as chairman of the American Friends Service Committee. Several accounts of his life and work have appeared since his death. Friend of Life is the most recent of these and one of the most detailed.

2456. [Wise] Heller, James G. Isaac M. Wise: his life, work, and thought. [New York] Union of American Hebrew Congregations [1965] xxi, 819 p. 64–24340 BM755.W5H5. Bibliography, including works of and about Rabbi Wise: p. 677–692.

Rabbi Heller has written not only a biography of a pivotal figure in Jewish history in the United States but also a full account of the Reform Judaism which Rabbi Wise (1819–1900) introduced into this country. Most of the book is a straightforward narrative of Wise’s life and achievements, which included the rounding of the Union of Hebrew Congregations, the Hebrew Union College, and the Central Conference of American Rabbis. A separate section of the volume sets forth a systematic outline of Wise’s thinking on subjects that interested and concerned him. Whenever possible the author has allowed Wise to speak for himself through excerpts from his letters and speeches. Among the subjects discussed are religion in general, Judaism and Reform Judaism, colonization and Zionism, Christianity, and civil rights for Jews.

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Chicago: "F. Representative Leaders," A Guide to the Study of the United States of America - Supplement in Oliver H. Orr, Jr. And Roy P. Basler, Eds. A Guide to the Study of the United States of America—Supplement, 1956-1965 (Washington, D.C.: Library of Congress, 1975), Pp.362-363 363. Original Sources, accessed September 23, 2018, http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=CNWCSDV2JD2JPFW.

MLA: . "F. Representative Leaders." A Guide to the Study of the United States of America - Supplement, in Oliver H. Orr, Jr. And Roy P. Basler, Eds. A Guide to the Study of the United States of America—Supplement, 1956-1965 (Washington, D.C.: Library of Congress, 1975), Pp.362-363, page 363. Original Sources. 23 Sep. 2018. www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=CNWCSDV2JD2JPFW.

Harvard: , 'F. Representative Leaders' in A Guide to the Study of the United States of America - Supplement. cited in , Oliver H. Orr, Jr. And Roy P. Basler, Eds. A Guide to the Study of the United States of America—Supplement, 1956-1965 (Washington, D.C.: Library of Congress, 1975), Pp.362-363, pp.363. Original Sources, retrieved 23 September 2018, from http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=CNWCSDV2JD2JPFW.