A Dictionary of American History

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Author: Thomas L. Purvis  | Date: 1995

Winnebago Indians

Winnebago Indians When first contacted by the French in 1634, these speakers of one of the Siouan languages occupied east-central Wis. and numbered 3,800. They were neutral during Pontiac’s War, but supported Tecumseh’s confederacy against Anglo-American expansion, fought as British allies in the War of 1812, drew back from the edge of a major conflict during the Winnebago War, and played a minor role in the Black Hawk War. Smallpox killed at least 500 in 1836, and they declined from 4,500 in 1843 to 2,500 by 1852 and 1,200 by 1865. They moved to Minn. in 1846, to S.Dak. in 1862, and Nebr. in 1865. Winnebago reservations are now located at 10 counties in Wis. (headquartered at the Dells) and Thurston County, Nebr.

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Chicago: Thomas L. Purvis, "Winnebago Indians," A Dictionary of American History in A Dictionary of American History (Cambridge, Mass.: Blackwell Reference, 1995), Original Sources, accessed April 25, 2018, http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=CPTSRHZBWQIZT9D.

MLA: Purvis, Thomas L. "Winnebago Indians." A Dictionary of American History, in A Dictionary of American History, Cambridge, Mass., Blackwell Reference, 1995, Original Sources. 25 Apr. 2018. www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=CPTSRHZBWQIZT9D.

Harvard: Purvis, TL, 'Winnebago Indians' in A Dictionary of American History. cited in 1995, A Dictionary of American History, Blackwell Reference, Cambridge, Mass.. Original Sources, retrieved 25 April 2018, from http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=CPTSRHZBWQIZT9D.