Lincoln’s Yarns and Stories: A Complete Collection of the Funny and Witty Anecdotes That Made Lincoln Famous as America’s Greatest Story Teller

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Author: Alexander K. McClure

Wanted Her Children Back.

On the 3rd of January, 1863, "Harper’s Weekly" appeared with a cartoon representing Columbia indignantly demanding of President Lincoln and Secretary of War Stanton that they restore to her those of her sons killed in battle. Below the picture is the reading matter

COLUMBIA: "Where are my 15,000 sons—murdered at Fredericksburg?"

LINCOLN: "This reminds me of a little joke—"

COLUMBIA: "Go tell your joke at Springfield!!"

The battle of Fredericksburg was fought on December 13th, 1862, between General Burnside, commanding the Army of the Potomac, and General Lee’s force. The Union troops, time and again, assaulted the heights where the Confederates had taken position, but were driven back with frightful losses. The enemy, being behind breastworks, suffered comparatively little. At the beginning of the fight the Confederate line was broken, but the result of the engagement was disastrous to the Union cause. Burnside had one thousand one hundred and fifty-two killed, nine thousand one hundred and one wounded, and three thousand two hundred and thirty-four missing, a total of thirteen thousand seven hundred and seventy-one. General Lee’s losses, all told, were not much more than five thousand men.

Burnside had succeeded McClellan in command of the Army of the Potomac, mainly, it was said, through the influence of Secretary of War Stanton. Three months before, McClellan had defeated Lee at Antietam, the bloodiest battle of the War, Lee’s losses footing up more than thirteen thousand men. At Fredericksburg, Burnside had about one hundred and twenty thousand men; at Antietam, McClellan had about eighty thousand. It has been maintained that Burnside should not have fought this battle, the chances of success being so few.

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Chicago: Alexander K. McClure, "Wanted Her Children Back.," Lincoln’s Yarns and Stories: A Complete Collection of the Funny and Witty Anecdotes That Made Lincoln Famous as America’s Greatest Story Teller, ed. Jameson, J. Franklin (John Franklin), 1859-1937 in Lincoln’s Yarns and Stories: A Complete Collection of the Funny and Witty Anecdotes That Made Lincoln Famous as America’s Greatest Story Teller Original Sources, accessed September 26, 2018, http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=CRIGLFXTIUFX71T.

MLA: McClure, Alexander K. "Wanted Her Children Back." Lincoln’s Yarns and Stories: A Complete Collection of the Funny and Witty Anecdotes That Made Lincoln Famous as America’s Greatest Story Teller, edited by Jameson, J. Franklin (John Franklin), 1859-1937, in Lincoln’s Yarns and Stories: A Complete Collection of the Funny and Witty Anecdotes That Made Lincoln Famous as America’s Greatest Story Teller, Original Sources. 26 Sep. 2018. www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=CRIGLFXTIUFX71T.

Harvard: McClure, AK, 'Wanted Her Children Back.' in Lincoln’s Yarns and Stories: A Complete Collection of the Funny and Witty Anecdotes That Made Lincoln Famous as America’s Greatest Story Teller, ed. . cited in , Lincoln’s Yarns and Stories: A Complete Collection of the Funny and Witty Anecdotes That Made Lincoln Famous as America’s Greatest Story Teller. Original Sources, retrieved 26 September 2018, from http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=CRIGLFXTIUFX71T.