American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 1

Contents:
Author: Noah Webster

Fret

FRET, v.t. [L. rodo, rosi, rado, to scrape. To fret or gnaw gives the sense of unevenness, roughness, in substances; the like appearance is given to fluids by agitation.]

1. To rub; to wear away a substance by friction; as, to fret cloth; to fret a piece of gold or other metal.

2. To corrode; to gnaw; to ear away; as, a worm frets the planks of a ship.

3. To impair; to wear away.

By starts, his fretted fortunes give him hope and fear.

4. To form into raised work.

5. To variegate; to diversify.

Yon gray lines that fret the clouds are messengers of day.

6. To agitate violently.

7. To agitate; to disturb; to make rough; to cause to ripple; as, to fret the surface of water.

8. To tease; to irritate; to vex; to make angry.

Fret not thyself because of evil doers. Psa 38.

9. To wear away; to chafe; to gall. Let not a saddle or harness fret the skin of your horse.

FRET, v.i.

1. To be worn away; to be corroded. Any substance will in time fret away by friction.

2. To eat or wear in; to make way of attrition or corrosion.

Many wheels arose, and fretted one into another with great excoriation.

3. To be agitated; to be in violent commotion; as the rancor that frets in the malignant breast.

4. To be vexed; to be chafed or irritated; to be angry; to utter peevish expressions.

He frets, he fumes, he stares, he stamps the ground.

FRET, n.

1. The agitation of the surface of a fluid by fermentation or other cause; a rippling on the surface of water; small undulations continually repeated.

2. Work raised in protuberances; or a kind of knot consisting of two lists or small fillets interlaced, used as an ornament in architecture.

3. Agitation of mind; commotion of temper; irritation; as, he keeps his mind in a continual fret.

Yet then did Dennis rave in furious fret.

4. A short piece of wire fixed on the fingerboard of a guitar, c., which being pressed against the strings varies the tone.

5. In heraldry, a bearing composed of bars crossed and interlaced.

FRET, v.t. To furnish with frets, as an instrument of music.

FRET, n. [L. fretum.] A frith, which see.

Contents:

Related Resources

None available for this document.

Download Options


Title: American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 1

Select an option:

*Note: A download may not start for up to 60 seconds.

Email Options


Title: American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 1

Select an option:

Email addres:

*Note: It may take up to 60 seconds for for the email to be generated.

Chicago: Noah Webster Jr., "Fret," American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 1 in An American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 1 (New York: S. Converse, 1828), Original Sources, accessed April 20, 2018, http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=CRJC5CCJ2LB4Z4E.

MLA: Webster, Noah, Jr. "Fret." American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 1, in An American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 1, New York, S. Converse, 1828, Original Sources. 20 Apr. 2018. www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=CRJC5CCJ2LB4Z4E.

Harvard: Webster, N, 'Fret' in American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 1. cited in 1828, An American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 1, S. Converse, New York. Original Sources, retrieved 20 April 2018, from http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=CRJC5CCJ2LB4Z4E.