Complete Works of Plutarch— Volume 3: Essays and Miscellanies

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Author: Plutarch

Chapter X.

OF IDEAS.

An idea is a being incorporeal, not subsisting by itself, but gives figure unto shapeless matter, and becomes the cause of its phenomena.

Socrates and Plato conjecture that these ideas are beings separate from matter, subsisting in the understanding and imagination of the deity, that is, of mind.

Aristotle accepted forms and ideas; but he doth not believe them separated from matter, or patterns of the things God has made.

Those Stoics, that are of the school of Zeno, profess that ideas are nothing else but the conceptions of our own mind.

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Chicago: Plutarch, "Chapter X.," Complete Works of Plutarch— Volume 3: Essays and Miscellanies, ed. Firth, John B. and trans. Jowett, Benjamin, 1817-1893 in Complete Works of Plutarch—Volume 3: Essays and Miscellanies Original Sources, accessed September 22, 2018, http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=CYZIAICCX9NR64E.

MLA: Plutarch. "Chapter X." Complete Works of Plutarch— Volume 3: Essays and Miscellanies, edited by Firth, John B., and translated by Jowett, Benjamin, 1817-1893, in Complete Works of Plutarch—Volume 3: Essays and Miscellanies, Original Sources. 22 Sep. 2018. www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=CYZIAICCX9NR64E.

Harvard: Plutarch, 'Chapter X.' in Complete Works of Plutarch— Volume 3: Essays and Miscellanies, ed. and trans. . cited in , Complete Works of Plutarch—Volume 3: Essays and Miscellanies. Original Sources, retrieved 22 September 2018, from http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=CYZIAICCX9NR64E.