A Dictionary of American History

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Author: Thomas L. Purvis  | Date: 1995

Separate but Equal

Separate but Equal This phrase summarized the legal philosophy behind de jure segregation in the US. The Supreme Court declared segregation laws constitutional so long as they met this test of Plessy v. Ferguson, but reversed itself in Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka (1954).

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Chicago: Thomas L. Purvis, "Separate but Equal," A Dictionary of American History in A Dictionary of American History (Cambridge, Mass.: Blackwell Reference, 1995), Original Sources, accessed April 26, 2018, http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=D1C7G7UM2E1H2YT.

MLA: Purvis, Thomas L. "Separate but Equal." A Dictionary of American History, in A Dictionary of American History, Cambridge, Mass., Blackwell Reference, 1995, Original Sources. 26 Apr. 2018. www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=D1C7G7UM2E1H2YT.

Harvard: Purvis, TL, 'Separate but Equal' in A Dictionary of American History. cited in 1995, A Dictionary of American History, Blackwell Reference, Cambridge, Mass.. Original Sources, retrieved 26 April 2018, from http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=D1C7G7UM2E1H2YT.