Leaves of Grass

Contents:
Author: Walt Whitman

The Prairie-Grass Dividing

The prairie-grass dividing, its special odor breathing,
I demand of it the spiritual corresponding,
Demand the most copious and close companionship of men,
Demand the blades to rise of words, acts, beings,
Those of the open atmosphere, coarse, sunlit, fresh, nutritious,
Those that go their own gait, erect, stepping with freedom and
command, leading not following,
Those with a never-quell’d audacity, those with sweet and lusty
flesh clear of taint,
Those that look carelessly in the faces of Presidents and governors,
as to say Who are you?
Those of earth-born passion, simple, never constrain’d, never obedient,
Those of inland America.

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American Romanticism

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Chicago: Walt Whitman, "The Prairie-Grass Dividing," Leaves of Grass, ed. Keil, Heinrich, 1822-1894 and trans. Seaton, R. C. in Leaves of Grass (New York: George E. Wood, ""Death-bed"" edition, 1892), Original Sources, accessed April 26, 2018, http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=D9M5CBP5P6Z4PEQ.

MLA: Whitman, Walt. "The Prairie-Grass Dividing." Leaves of Grass, edited by Keil, Heinrich, 1822-1894, and translated by Seaton, R. C., in Leaves of Grass, New York, George E. Wood, ""Death-bed"" edition, 1892, Original Sources. 26 Apr. 2018. www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=D9M5CBP5P6Z4PEQ.

Harvard: Whitman, W, 'The Prairie-Grass Dividing' in Leaves of Grass, ed. and trans. . cited in ""Death-bed"" edition, 1892, Leaves of Grass, George E. Wood, New York. Original Sources, retrieved 26 April 2018, from http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=D9M5CBP5P6Z4PEQ.