Correspondence of the American Revolution: Being Letters of Eminent Men to George Washington, from the Time of His Taking Command of the Army to the End of His Presidency, Vol. 1

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Author: Philip Schuyler

U.S. History

From Major-General Schuyler.

Fort Edward, 16 June, 1777.

DEAR SIR,

I did myself the honor to address you from Saratoga on the 14th instant. On the next day, Amsbury and Adams (mentioned in General St. Clair’s letter, copy whereof I transmitted to Congress by letter under cover to your Excellency) arrived at Saratoga. What passed between us, and what information he gave, is noted in paper Number One. Number Two is the letter which was inclosed between the bottoms of the canteen.

If the information which Amsbury gives is to be relied upon, as I think it is, we shall soon be attacked at Ticonderoga; and although I think the force now there may be sufficient to hold that important post, yet I have no troops to oppose either Sir John Johnson, if he should penetrate to the Mohawk River, or any to prevent the communication between this and Fort George from being cut off; nor have I force, if these should not be attempted by the enemy, to march to the relief of Ticonderoga. In this situation, I am under the necessity of applying to your Excellency for a reënforcement.

From the time I left Albany till my return to that place, nothing, comparatively speaking, has been done towards throwing into Ticonderoga a stock of provisions of the meat kind; and of the little that is left there, I fear to learn that a very considerable part is damaged; and what is equally bad, if not worse, is, that we have very little hopes of a supply of fresh meat. A week or two may remedy the latter, but it may then be too late to convey a quantity to Ticonderoga. If, therefore, any salted pork or beef can be spared from Peekskill, or elsewhere, I wish it may be ordered up, without the least delay.

Should your Excellency order me a reënforcement, permit me to suggest, that, if there are no vessels at Peekskill or Fishkill to transport the troops to Albany, it may be proper, by express, to direct the commanding officer at Albany to send down from thence a sufficient number of sloops.

Such is the inattention, in this department, that not less than a thousand barrels of flour are now lying at this post, and only five wagons employed to carry it to Fort George, the distance of fifteen miles.

Permit me to beg that your Excellency will communicate the contents of this despatch to Congress, as I cannot find time to do myself the honor to write to them.

I shall (consulting with the General Officers at Ticonderoga) try to send an answer to Mr. Levius’s letter, as from General Sullivan, in which I shall leave him to suppose (what I do not by any means believe) that General Sullivan has entered into his views. Your Excellency will please to mention my intention to General Sullivan, and to assure him that my only view is to serve the public. I am, dear Sir, most sincerely,

Your Excellency’s most obedient, humble servant,

PHILIP SCHUYLER.

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Chicago: Philip Schuyler, "From Major-General Schuyler.," Correspondence of the American Revolution: Being Letters of Eminent Men to George Washington, from the Time of His Taking Command of the Army to the End of His Presidency, Vol. 1 in Correspondence of the American Revolution: Being Letters of Eminent Men to George Washington, from the Time of His Taking Command of the Army to the End of His Presidency, ed. Jared Sparks (Freeport, NY: Books for Libraries Press, 1853), 383–384. Original Sources, accessed April 26, 2018, http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=DAJJFV7AF2F2WHN.

MLA: Schuyler, Philip. "From Major-General Schuyler." Correspondence of the American Revolution: Being Letters of Eminent Men to George Washington, from the Time of His Taking Command of the Army to the End of His Presidency, Vol. 1, in Correspondence of the American Revolution: Being Letters of Eminent Men to George Washington, from the Time of His Taking Command of the Army to the End of His Presidency, edited by Jared Sparks, Vol. 1, Freeport, NY, Books for Libraries Press, 1853, pp. 383–384. Original Sources. 26 Apr. 2018. www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=DAJJFV7AF2F2WHN.

Harvard: Schuyler, P, 'From Major-General Schuyler.' in Correspondence of the American Revolution: Being Letters of Eminent Men to George Washington, from the Time of His Taking Command of the Army to the End of His Presidency, Vol. 1. cited in 1853, Correspondence of the American Revolution: Being Letters of Eminent Men to George Washington, from the Time of His Taking Command of the Army to the End of His Presidency, ed. , Books for Libraries Press, Freeport, NY, pp.383–384. Original Sources, retrieved 26 April 2018, from http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=DAJJFV7AF2F2WHN.