American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 1

Contents:
Author: Noah Webster

Dead

DEAD,

1. Deprived or destitute of life; that state of a being, animal or vegetable, in which the organs of motion and life have ceased to perform their functions, and have become incapable of performing them, or of being restored to a state of activity.

The men are dead who sought thy life. Exo 4.

It is sometimes followed by of before the cause of death; as, dead of hunger, or of a fever.

2. Having never had life, or having been deprived of vital action before birth; as, the child was born dead.

3. Without life; inanimate.

All, all but truth, drops dead-born from the press.

4. Without vegetable life; as a dead tree.

5. Imitating death; deep or sound; as a dead sleep.

6. Perfectly still; motionless as death; as a dead calm; a dead weight.

7. Empty; vacant; not enlivened by variety; as a dead void space; a dead plain.

We say also, a dead level, for a perfectly level surface.

8. Unemployed; useless; unprofitable. A man’s faculties may lie dead, or his goods remain dead on his hands. So dead capital or stock is that which produces no profit.

9. Dull; inactive; as a dead sale of commodities.

10. Dull; gloomy; still; not enlivened; as a dead winter; a dead season.

11. Still; deep; obscure; as the dead darkness of the night.

12. Dull; not lively; not resembling life; as the dead coloring of a piece; a dead eye.

13. Dull; heavy; as a dead sound.

14. Dull; frigid; lifeless; cold; not animated; not affecting; used of prayer.

15. Tasteless; vapid; spiritless; used of liquors.

16. Uninhabited; as dead walls.

17. Dull; without natural force or efficacy; not lively or brisk; as a dead fire.

18. In a state of spiritual death; void of grace; lying under the power of sin.

19. Impotent; unable to procreate.

20. Decayed in grace.

Thou hast a name that thou livest, and art dead. Rev 3.

21. Not proceeding from spiritual life; not producing good works; as, faith without works is dead. James 2.

22. Proceeding from corrupt nature, not from spiritual life or a gracious principle; as dead works. Heb 9:14.

23. In law, cut off from the rights of a citizen: deprived of power of enjoying the rights of property; as one banished or becoming a monk is civilly dead.

Dead language, a language which is no longer spoken or in common use by a people, and known only in writings; as the Hebrew, Greek and Latin.

Dead rising or rising line, the parts of a ship’s floor or bottom throughout her length, where the floor timber is terminated on the lower futtock.

DEAD, n. ded.

1. The dead signifies dead men.

Ye shall not make cuttings for the dead. Lev 19.

2. The state of the dead; or death.

This is John the Baptist; he is risen from the dead. Mat 14.

DEAD, n. ded. The time when there is a remarkable stillness or gloom; depth; as in the midst of winter or of night, are familiar expressions.

DEAD, v.i. ded. To lose life or force.

DEAD, v.t. ded. To deprive of life, force or vigor.

DEAD’-DOING, a. Destructive; killing.

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Chicago: Noah Webster Jr., "Dead," American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 1 in An American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 1 (New York: S. Converse, 1828), Original Sources, accessed April 21, 2018, http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=DAVTFZK6YU2UXDC.

MLA: Webster, Noah, Jr. "Dead." American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 1, in An American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 1, New York, S. Converse, 1828, Original Sources. 21 Apr. 2018. www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=DAVTFZK6YU2UXDC.

Harvard: Webster, N, 'Dead' in American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 1. cited in 1828, An American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 1, S. Converse, New York. Original Sources, retrieved 21 April 2018, from http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=DAVTFZK6YU2UXDC.