A Dictionary of American History

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Author: Thomas L. Purvis  | Date: 1995

Kansa Indians

Kansa Indians The Kansa (or Kaw) are a group speaking one of the Siouan languages, that lived along the lower Missouri River. They may have numbered 3,000 in 1780. Although often in conflict with neighboring Indians, they avoided war with Anglo-Americans. In 1850 their 1,700 members accepted a 390 square-mile reservation on the Neosho River in Kans., but by 1873, when they relocated to the Arkansas River, they had been reduced to 533. In 1889 only 194 Kansa remained. They have a reservation in Osage County, Okla.

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Chicago: Thomas L. Purvis, "Kansa Indians," A Dictionary of American History in A Dictionary of American History (Cambridge, Mass.: Blackwell Reference, 1995), Original Sources, accessed April 21, 2018, http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=DBTKVQAK18U1SLS.

MLA: Purvis, Thomas L. "Kansa Indians." A Dictionary of American History, in A Dictionary of American History, Cambridge, Mass., Blackwell Reference, 1995, Original Sources. 21 Apr. 2018. www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=DBTKVQAK18U1SLS.

Harvard: Purvis, TL, 'Kansa Indians' in A Dictionary of American History. cited in 1995, A Dictionary of American History, Blackwell Reference, Cambridge, Mass.. Original Sources, retrieved 21 April 2018, from http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=DBTKVQAK18U1SLS.