Messages and Papers of James Madison

Contents:
Author: James Madison

Proclamations.

[From Niles’s Weekly Register, vol. 1, p. 448.]

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas information has been received that a number of individuals who have deserted from the Army of the United States have become sensible of their offense and are desirous of returning to their duty, a full pardon is hereby granted and proclaimed to each and all such individuals as shall within four months from the date hereof surrender themselves to the commanding officer of any military post within the United States or the Territories thereof.

In testimony whereof I have caused the seal of the United States to be attired to these presents, and signed the same with my hand.

Done at the city of Washington, the 7th day of February, A.D. 1812, and of the Independence of the United States the thirty-sixth.[SEAL.]

JAMES MADISON.

By the President:

JAMES MONROE,

Secretary of State.

[From Annals of Congress, Twelfth Congress, part 2, 2223.]

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas the Congress of the United States, by virtue of the constituted authority vested in them, have declared by their act bearing date the 18th day of the present month that war exists between the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and the dependencies thereof and the United States of America and their Territories:

Now, therefore, I, James Madison, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim the same to all whom it may concern; and I do specially enjoin on all persons holding offices, civil or military, under the authority of the United States that they be vigilant and zealous in discharging the duties respectively incident thereto; and I do moreover exhort all the good people of the United States, as they love their country, as they value the precious heritage derived from the virtue and valor of their fathers, as they feel the wrongs which have forced on them the last resort of injured nations, and as they consult the best means under the blessing of Divine Providence of abridging its calamities, that they exert themselves in preserving order, in promoting concord, in maintaining the authority and efficacy of the laws, and in supporting and invigorating allthe measures which may be adopted by the constituted authorities for obtaining a speedy, a just, and an honorable peace.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the

seal of the United States to be affixed to these presents. Done at the city of Washington, the 19th day of June, 1812, and of the Independence of the United States the thirty-sixth. By the President:

JAMES MADISON.

JAMES MONROE,

Secretary of State.

[From Annals of Congress, Twelfth Congress, part 2, 2224.]

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.


Whereas the Congress of the United States, by a joint resolution of the two Houses, have signified a request that a day may be recommended to be observed by the people of the United States with religious solemnity as a day of public humiliation and prayer; and

Whereas such a recommendation will enable the several religious denominations and societies so disposed to offer at one and the same time their common vows and adorations to Almighty God on the solemn occasion produced by the war in which He has been pleased to permit the injustice of a foreign power to involve these United States:

I do therefore recommend the third Thursday in August next as a convenient day to be set apart for the devout purposes of rendering the Sovereign of the Universe and the Benefactor of Mankind the public homage due to His holy attributes; of acknowledging the transgressions which might justly provoke the manifestations of His divine displeasure; of seeking His merciful forgiveness and His assistance in the great duties of repentance and amendment, and especially of offering fervent supplications that in the present season of calamity and war He would take the American people under His peculiar care and protection; that He would guide their public councils, animate their patriotism, and bestow His blessing on their arms; that He would inspire all nations with a love of justice and of concord and with a reverence for the unerring precept of our holy religion to do to others as they would require that others should do to them; and, finally, that, turning the hearts of our enemies from the violence and injustice which sway their councils against us, He would hasten a restoration of the blessings of peace.

Given at Washington, the 9th day of July, A. D. 1812. [SEAL.]

JAMES MADISON.

By the President:

JAMES MONROE,

Secretary of State.

[From Niles’s Weekly Register, vol. 3, p. 101.]

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

A PROCLAMATION.

Whereas information has been received that a number of individuals who have deserted from the Army of the United States have become sensible of their offenses and are desirous of returning to their duty, a full pardon is hereby granted and proclaimed to each and all such individuals as shall within four months from the date hereof surrender themselves to the commanding officer of any military post within the United States or the Territories thereof.

In testimony whereof I have caused the seal of the United States to be affixed to these presents, and signed the same with my hand.

Done at the city of Washington, the 8th day of October, A.D. 1812, and of the Independence of the United States the thirty-seventh. [SEAL.]

JAMES MADISON.

By the President:

JAMES MONROE,

Secretary of State.

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Chicago: James Madison Jr., "Proclamations.," Messages and Papers of James Madison in James D. Richardson, Ed., a Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents, James Madison (U.S. Bureau of National Literature and Art, 1910), 1:571 498. Original Sources, accessed April 25, 2018, http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=DKEKKP9VCULDA5U.

MLA: Madison, James, Jr. "Proclamations." Messages and Papers of James Madison, in James D. Richardson, Ed., a Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents, James Madison (U.S. Bureau of National Literature and Art, 1910), 1:571, page 498. Original Sources. 25 Apr. 2018. www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=DKEKKP9VCULDA5U.

Harvard: Madison, J, 'Proclamations.' in Messages and Papers of James Madison. cited in , James D. Richardson, Ed., a Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents, James Madison (U.S. Bureau of National Literature and Art, 1910), 1:571, pp.498. Original Sources, retrieved 25 April 2018, from http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=DKEKKP9VCULDA5U.