Public Papers of Lyndon B. Johnson, 1967

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Author: Lyndon B. Johnson  | Date: November 14, 1967

486
Remarks of Welcome at the White House to Prime Minister Sato of Japan.
November 14, 1967

Mr. Prime Minister and Mrs. Sato, Mr. Secretary of State, distinguished ladies and gentlemen:

Mr. Prime Minister, Mrs. Johnson and I are delighted to be able to welcome you here today to the garden of the White House to express to you our great pleasure that you have been able to come and visit with us. We appreciate very much the cooperation that has been extended by your Government and your people to our country, and the very close manner in which we have worked together for the last several years.

We have great pride in the fact that our Cabinet has paid periodic visits to your country and they have always been received with a very warm welcome. They feel that the visits have been quite productive.

The channels between us have always been open. The dialogue has been continuous. We, I think, both recognize the very great responsibilities that our governments have to the people of Asia. We have joined together in a good many enterprises for their general betterment.

I think the objectives of the American people and the Japanese people are very much the same.

First of all, we want peace in a!l the world, and particularly in that troubled part of the world where we do not have it now.

We want education for our children, health for our people, a small amount of recreation that can make us enjoy the good things of life, and by working closely together, we have moved in that direction.

You have been playing a major role in the new regional organizations in that part of the world that we think will bring Asia forward. We have reference particularly to the Asian Development Bank. We have great hopes for that enterprise.

We meet this morning as the spokesmen for two quite powerful nations in the world, but I hope two very responsible nations.

I believe that our destinies are very closely linked together by geography, by national interests, and by humanitarian concern.

We are glad we have good weather for you. We trust that it will last during our discussions.

We believe those discussions have much to recommend them. We hope they will be productive. We know this: that we will certainly profit from your observations concerning your views of your own country in that part of the world in matters of mutual interest.

We hope you enjoy your stay here. We want it to be a happy one.

NOTE: The President spoke at 11:11 a.m. on the South Lawn at the White House where Prime MinisterEisaku Sato of Japan was given a formal welcome with full military honors. In his opening words he also referred to Secretary of State Dean Rusk. The Prime Minister responded as follows:

Mr. President, Mrs. Johnson, Mr. Secretary of State, distinguished guests, ladies and gentlemen:

I recall it was just 3 years ago that you greeted us most warmly here at the White House. I have come again to Washington, this time with my wife. We are most grateful for the cordial welcome you have accorded us today.

As on my previous visit I have come again to your country representing the Government and people of Japan, an ally closely bound by ties of friendship with the United States.

I look forward to having frank talks with you, Mr. President, on matters of common concern to our two countries.

I wish to express my deep respect to you, Mr. President, for the great efforts being made by the United States under your able leadership to bring peace and stability to the world, particularly in Asia at this moment.
The basic purposes of our foreign policy are the safeguarding of freedom and a dedication to peace.

There have been many developments in Asia since my previous visit here 3 years ago. Some have been desirable and encouraging while others have been causing deep concern.

But I am firmly convinced that as long as we face these changes with wisdom and courage, with the common objective of safeguarding freedom and peace, the road to stability and prosperity in Asia will be opened before us.

The need for cooperation between our two countries based on mutual trust and understanding has never been greater than it is today for the future of Asia and, indeed, for the entire world. Therefore, Mr. President, I look forward to frank discussions with you on problems between our two countries with the view to seeking an adjustment and expansion of our basic national interests.

It will not be our two countries alone, but all of Asia I am sure, who will benefit from close relations of mutual trust between Japan and the United States.
Thank you.

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Chicago: Lyndon B. Johnson, "486 Remarks of Welcome at the White House to Prime Minister Sato of Japan.," Public Papers of Lyndon B. Johnson, 1967 in Federal Register Division. National Archives and Records Service, Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States, Lyndon B. Johnson, 1967 (Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1956-), P.1196 1024. Original Sources, accessed January 22, 2019, http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=PBBLY2A7WQBT75Q.

MLA: Johnson, Lyndon B. "486 Remarks of Welcome at the White House to Prime Minister Sato of Japan." Public Papers of Lyndon B. Johnson, 1967, in Federal Register Division. National Archives and Records Service, Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States, Lyndon B. Johnson, 1967 (Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1956-), P.1196, page 1024. Original Sources. 22 Jan. 2019. www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=PBBLY2A7WQBT75Q.

Harvard: Johnson, LB, '486 Remarks of Welcome at the White House to Prime Minister Sato of Japan.' in Public Papers of Lyndon B. Johnson, 1967. cited in , Federal Register Division. National Archives and Records Service, Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States, Lyndon B. Johnson, 1967 (Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1956-), P.1196, pp.1024. Original Sources, retrieved 22 January 2019, from http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=PBBLY2A7WQBT75Q.