Crisis in Confidence, 1960-1980

Contents:
Author: Kennedy Administration  | Date: August 30, 1961

White House Statement on Soviet Resumption of Nuclear Weapons Tests

THE SOVIET government’s decision to resume nuclear weapons testing will be met with deepest concern and resentment throughout the world. The Soviet government’s decision to resume nuclear weapons testing presents a hazard to every human being throughout the world by increasing the dangers of nuclear fallout. The Sovietgovernment’s decision to resume nuclear weapons testing is in utter disregard of the desire of mankind for a decrease in the arms race. The Soviet government’s decision to resume nuclear weapons testing presents a threat to the entire world by increasing the dangers of a thermo-nuclear holocaust. The Soviet government’s decision to resume nuclear weapons testing indicates the complete hypocrisy of its professions about general and complete disarmament.

For three years world attention has centered on the negotiations in Geneva for a treaty to secure an end to nuclear testing. Until last March it appeared that slow but encouraging progress had been made. At that time, the Soviet Union reversed its own earlier positions on key issues, refused to discuss seriously the genuine efforts made by the United States and the United Kingdom to meet known Soviet views, and blocked the path toward a nuclear test ban treaty. In order to avoid missing any possible opportunity to arrive at an agreement, the United States and the United Kingdom remained at the negotiating table. Only this week Ambassador Dean has made additional proposals in the hope of moving toward a test ban under effective international control. Urgent discussion of this issue had been scheduled at United States initiative at the forthcoming session of the General Assembly in the hopes that constructive debate could show the way to surmount the impasse at Geneva..

The pretext offered by the announcement for Soviet resumption of weapons testing is the very crisis which they themselves have created by threatening to disturb the peace which has existed in Germany and Berlin. It is not the first time they have made such charges against those who have dared to stand in the way of Soviet aggression. In addition, the announcement links the Soviet resumption of testing with threats of massive weapons which it must know cannot intimidate the rest of the world.

The purpose and motivation of this Soviet behavior now seems apparent: The Soviet Government wished to abandon serious negotiations in order to free its hand to resume nuclear weapons testing.

The United States continues to share the view of the people of the world as to the importance of an agreement to end nuclear weapons tests under effective safeguards. Such an agreement would represent a major breakthrough in the search for an end to the arms race. It would stop the accumulation of stock piles of even more powerful weapons. It would inhibit the spread of nuclear weapons to other countries with its increased risks of nuclear war.

These results, with their prospects for reducing the possibility of a nuclear war, have been blocked by the Soviet unilateral decision to resume nuclear testing. The Soviet Union bears a heavy responsibility before all humanity for this decision, a decision which was made in complete disregard of the United Nations. The termination of the moratorium on nuclear testing by the Soviet unilateral decision leaves the United States under the necessity of deciding what its own national interests require.

Under these circumstances, Ambassador Arthur Dean is being recalled immediately from Geneva.

Contents:

Related Resources

None available for this document.

Download Options


Title: Crisis in Confidence, 1960-1980

Select an option:

*Note: A download may not start for up to 60 seconds.

Email Options


Title: Crisis in Confidence, 1960-1980

Select an option:

Email addres:

*Note: It may take up to 60 seconds for for the email to be generated.

Chicago: Kennedy Administration, "White House Statement on Soviet Resumption of Nuclear Weapons Tests, 1961," Crisis in Confidence, 1960-1980 in Public Papers of the Presidents, J. F. Kennedy, 1961, Pp.580-581 581. Original Sources, accessed January 16, 2019, http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=PBJ1IT8X8QT2BR9.

MLA: Administration, Kennedy. "White House Statement on Soviet Resumption of Nuclear Weapons Tests, 1961." Crisis in Confidence, 1960-1980, in Public Papers of the Presidents, J. F. Kennedy, 1961, Pp.580-581, page 581. Original Sources. 16 Jan. 2019. www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=PBJ1IT8X8QT2BR9.

Harvard: Administration, K, 'White House Statement on Soviet Resumption of Nuclear Weapons Tests, 1961' in Crisis in Confidence, 1960-1980. cited in , Public Papers of the Presidents, J. F. Kennedy, 1961, Pp.580-581, pp.581. Original Sources, retrieved 16 January 2019, from http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=PBJ1IT8X8QT2BR9.