Correspondence of the American Revolution: Being Letters of Eminent Men to George Washington, from the Time of His Taking Command of the Army to the End of His Presidency, Vol. 4

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Author: George Mason

U.S. History

From George Mason.

Richmond, 6 November, 1787.

DEAR SIR,

On Saturday last, in a Committee of the Whole House upon the State of the Commonwealth, to whom were referred sundry petitions, some praying for an emission of paper money, and others for making property, at an appraised value, a tender in discharge of debts, I moved and carried the resolutions of which I inclose a copy. During the discussion of the subject, after treating the petitions as founded upon fraud and knavery, I called upon any of the members of the House, who were advocates for such measures, if any such there were, to come boldly forward, and explain their real motives. But they declined entering into the debate, and the resolutions passed unanimously. I hope they have given this iniquitous measure a mortal stab, and that we shall not again be troubled with it.

A resolution this day passed for an absolute prohibition of all imported spirits, with some others, in my opinion, almost equally impolitic, and calculated to subject the eastern part of the State to the arbitrary impositions of the western. The prohibition of the single article of rum, would cut off a net revenue of eleven thousand pounds per annum. When the bill is brought in, I think they will find such insuperable difficulties in the mode of carrying it into execution, as will oblige them to abandon the project.

I take the liberty of inclosing a copy of the resolutions upon the proposed Federal Government; by which it will appear that the Assembly have given time for full examination and discussion of the subject, and have avoided giving any opinion of their own upon the subject.

I beg to be presented to your lady and family; and am, with the greatest respect and regard, &c.,

GEORGE MASON.

P. S. A plan is before the House for a three years’ instalment of all debts. Though, in my opinion, very exceptionable, it is better than the plans of that kind heretofore proposed, and I believe will be adopted, in spite of every opposition that can be made to it. I shall, therefore, instead of pointing the little opposition I can make against the whole, endeavour to change the plan, by making the consent of the creditor necessary, and the instalments voluntary, and, in such cases, giving the force of judgments to the instalment bonds.

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Chicago: George Mason, "From George Mason.," Correspondence of the American Revolution: Being Letters of Eminent Men to George Washington, from the Time of His Taking Command of the Army to the End of His Presidency, Vol. 4 in Correspondence of the American Revolution: Being Letters of Eminent Men to George Washington, from the Time of His Taking Command of the Army to the End of His Presidency, ed. Jared Sparks (Freeport, NY: Books for Libraries Press, 1853), 190–192. Original Sources, accessed January 22, 2019, http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=Q785QDCXZPFCD47.

MLA: Mason, George. "From George Mason." Correspondence of the American Revolution: Being Letters of Eminent Men to George Washington, from the Time of His Taking Command of the Army to the End of His Presidency, Vol. 4, in Correspondence of the American Revolution: Being Letters of Eminent Men to George Washington, from the Time of His Taking Command of the Army to the End of His Presidency, edited by Jared Sparks, Vol. 4, Freeport, NY, Books for Libraries Press, 1853, pp. 190–192. Original Sources. 22 Jan. 2019. www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=Q785QDCXZPFCD47.

Harvard: Mason, G, 'From George Mason.' in Correspondence of the American Revolution: Being Letters of Eminent Men to George Washington, from the Time of His Taking Command of the Army to the End of His Presidency, Vol. 4. cited in 1853, Correspondence of the American Revolution: Being Letters of Eminent Men to George Washington, from the Time of His Taking Command of the Army to the End of His Presidency, ed. , Books for Libraries Press, Freeport, NY, pp.190–192. Original Sources, retrieved 22 January 2019, from http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=Q785QDCXZPFCD47.