Correspondence of the American Revolution: Being Letters of Eminent Men to George Washington, from the Time of His Taking Command of the Army to the End of His Presidency, Vol. 3

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Author: William Alexander

U.S. History

From Major-General Lord Stirling.

23 June, 1780.

DEAR SIR,

Just as I was setting out this morning to join your Excellency, I had intelligence that the enemy were out, and advancing to Springfield. I immediately wrote to the Commanding Officers of the militia, from Burlington to near Easton (and despatched messengers with the letters open); desired them to push down for further orders; and wrote General Greene what I had done, that he might, in case the enemy retired, send them counter orders. I then came through part of Morris county to Chatham, to see if I could be of any use in that quarter. I there met with General Wilkinson and Charles Stewart, who assured me that the enemy, after advancing to Springfield, and burning also every house there, had retired. The last I can find of them, their rear had passed the four-mile stone from Elizabethtown, on full trot. Some militia had got in their rear, and others attending their flanks, as regular as their flanking parties in their approach. They were early skirmished with; they were checked for some time at Connecticut Farms; the bridge at Springfield was nobly contended, for near forty minutes. The fork of the road, near Campbell’s Mills, was so well disputed as to stop the further progress of the enemy’s right column.

In short, in every part, our troops, Continental and militia, have behaved gloriously, and have made the enemy pay dearly for their jaunt. General Wilkinson informed me that General Greene had intelligence that all the enemy’s flanking companies were to embark last night. I saw six British and Yagers prisoners at Chatham, who all agreed that General Knyphausen commanded this day. I suspect Sir Harry means to make some lively stroke above you. I met General Wayne near Chatham, where he intends to wait your Excellency’s further orders. I shall be ell to join your Excellency early in the morning; and am, most sincerely,

Your Excellency’s most humble servant,

STIRLING.

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Chicago: William Alexander, "From Major-General Lord Stirling.," Correspondence of the American Revolution: Being Letters of Eminent Men to George Washington, from the Time of His Taking Command of the Army to the End of His Presidency, Vol. 3 in Correspondence of the American Revolution: Being Letters of Eminent Men to George Washington, from the Time of His Taking Command of the Army to the End of His Presidency, ed. Jared Sparks (Freeport, NY: Books for Libraries Press, 1853), 5–6. Original Sources, accessed July 20, 2019, http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=16MVBDRL7LEPGUF.

MLA: Alexander, William. "From Major-General Lord Stirling." Correspondence of the American Revolution: Being Letters of Eminent Men to George Washington, from the Time of His Taking Command of the Army to the End of His Presidency, Vol. 3, in Correspondence of the American Revolution: Being Letters of Eminent Men to George Washington, from the Time of His Taking Command of the Army to the End of His Presidency, edited by Jared Sparks, Vol. 3, Freeport, NY, Books for Libraries Press, 1853, pp. 5–6. Original Sources. 20 Jul. 2019. www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=16MVBDRL7LEPGUF.

Harvard: Alexander, W, 'From Major-General Lord Stirling.' in Correspondence of the American Revolution: Being Letters of Eminent Men to George Washington, from the Time of His Taking Command of the Army to the End of His Presidency, Vol. 3. cited in 1853, Correspondence of the American Revolution: Being Letters of Eminent Men to George Washington, from the Time of His Taking Command of the Army to the End of His Presidency, ed. , Books for Libraries Press, Freeport, NY, pp.5–6. Original Sources, retrieved 20 July 2019, from http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=16MVBDRL7LEPGUF.