Letters to His Son on the Art of Becoming a Man of the World and a Gentleman, 1759— 65

Contents:
Author: Philip Dormer Stanhope

Letter CCLXXVII

BLACKHEATH, July 15, 1765

MY DEAR FRIEND: I told you in my last, that you should hear from me again, as soon as I had anything more to write; and now I have too much to write, therefore will refer you to the "Gazette," and the office letters, for all that has been done; and advise you to suspend your opinion, as I do, about all that is to be done. Many more changes are talked of, but so idly, and variously, that I give credit to none of them. There has been pretty clean sweeping already; and I do not remember, in my time, to have seen so much at once, as an entire new Board of Treasury, and two new Secretaries of State, ’cum multis aliis’, etc.

Here is a new political arch almost built, but of materials of so different a nature, and without a key-stone, that it does not, in my opinion, indicate either strength or duration. It will certainly require repairs, and a key-stone next winter; and that key-stone will, and must necessarily be, Mr. Pitt. It is true he might have been that keystone now; and would have accepted it, but not without Lord Temple’s consent, and Lord Temple positively refused. There was evidently some trick in this, but what is past my conjecturing. ’Davus sum, non OEdipus’.

There is a manifest interregnum in the Treasury; for I do suppose that Lord Rockingham and Mr. Dowdeswell will not think proper to be very active. General Conway, who is your Secretary, has certainly parts at least equal to his business, to which, I dare say, he will apply. The same may be said, I believe, of the Duke of Grafton; and indeed there is no magic requisite for the executive part of those employments. The ministerial part is another thing; they must scramble with their fellowservants, for power and favor, as well as they can. Foreign affairs are not so much as mentioned, and, I verily believe, not thought of. But surely some counterbalance would be necessary to the Family compact; and, if not soon contracted, will be too late. God bless you!

Contents:

Related Resources

None available for this document.

Download Options


Title: Letters to His Son on the Art of Becoming a Man of the World and a Gentleman, 1759— 65

Select an option:

*Note: A download may not start for up to 60 seconds.

Email Options


Title: Letters to His Son on the Art of Becoming a Man of the World and a Gentleman, 1759— 65

Select an option:

Email addres:

*Note: It may take up to 60 seconds for for the email to be generated.

Chicago: Philip Dormer Stanhope, "Letter CCLXXVII," Letters to His Son on the Art of Becoming a Man of the World and a Gentleman, 1759— 65, trans. Paul, Eden, 1865-1944, and Paul, Cedar in Letters to His Son on the Art of Becoming a Man of the World and a Gentleman, 1759—65 Original Sources, accessed July 16, 2019, http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=16NDFZMNVJUG1TX.

MLA: Stanhope, Philip Dormer. "Letter CCLXXVII." Letters to His Son on the Art of Becoming a Man of the World and a Gentleman, 1759— 65, translted by Paul, Eden, 1865-1944, and Paul, Cedar, in Letters to His Son on the Art of Becoming a Man of the World and a Gentleman, 1759—65, Original Sources. 16 Jul. 2019. www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=16NDFZMNVJUG1TX.

Harvard: Stanhope, PD, 'Letter CCLXXVII' in Letters to His Son on the Art of Becoming a Man of the World and a Gentleman, 1759— 65, trans. . cited in , Letters to His Son on the Art of Becoming a Man of the World and a Gentleman, 1759—65. Original Sources, retrieved 16 July 2019, from http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=16NDFZMNVJUG1TX.