Correspondence of the American Revolution: Being Letters of Eminent Men to George Washington, from the Time of His Taking Command of the Army to the End of His Presidency, Vol. 1

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Author: John Hancock

U.S. History

From the President of Congress.

Philadelphia, 25 June, 1776.

SIR,

Your letter of the 21st instant, by Mr. Bennett, with the inclosure, was duly received and laid before Congress, as you will perceive by the inclosed resolves, to which I beg leave to request your attention.

Although the Commissioners have undoubtedly mistaken the intention of Congress, yet the terms in which the resolve is conceived, namely, "That the General be empowered to employ in Canada a number of Indians, not exceeding two thousand," may, at first view, seem to confine their employment to the limits of that Province, and to give a latitude of construction as to the place in which they are to be raised; and in this sense they must have been understood by General Schuyler and the other Commissioners. I am, however, to request you will give orders to have a stop put to raising the Mohegan and Stockbridge Indians, as soon as possible. I shall write Governor Trumbull to the same purpose.

The conduct of the Quartermaster-General, in detaining the tents sent from this place to Massachusetts Bay, is a stretch of office which, though it may be well meant, is certainly a very extraordinary one. You will, therefore, be pleased to order them to be delivered up, and forwarded to the Massachusetts Bay as soon as possible.

The other resolves, herewith transmitted, calculated to suppress insurrections and to promote good order and obedience to laws in the United Colonies, are so full and explicit that I need not enlarge. It is sufficient to observe, that internal convulsions do always extremely weaken the force and springs of Government, and must necessarily render its operations against foreign enemies less vigorous and decisive.*

Application having been made to Congress with regard to victualling the Flying Camp, I am directed to request you will inform them what is the cost of a ration, as furnished by the Commissary-General.

The several matters in your letters are before a

Committee. The proposal respecting a troop of horse is liked; and as soon as the Committee bring in their report, and it is considered, you shall be made acquainted with the result.

I have the honor to be, Sir, your most obedient and very humble servant,

President JOHN HANCOCK.

*In Congress, June 24th, "Resolved, that all persons abiding within any of the United Colonies, and deriving protection from the laws of the same, owe allegiance to the said laws, and are members of such Colony; and that all persons passing through, visiting, or making a temporary stay in any of the said Colonies, being entitled to the protection of the laws during the time of such passage, visitation, or temporary stay, owe, during the same, allegiance thereto;

"That all persons, members of, or owing allegiance to any of the United Colonies, as before described, who shall levy war against any of the said Colonies within the same, or be adherent to the King of Great Britain, or other enemies of the said Colonies, or any of them, within the same, giving to him or them aid and comfort, are guilty of treason against such Colony;

"That it be recommended to the Legislatures of the several United Colonies, to pass laws for punishing, in such manner as to them shall seem fit, such persons before described, as shall be provably attainted of open deed, by people of their condition, of any of the treasons before described."

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Chicago: John Hancock, "From the President of Congress.," Correspondence of the American Revolution: Being Letters of Eminent Men to George Washington, from the Time of His Taking Command of the Army to the End of His Presidency, Vol. 1 in Correspondence of the American Revolution: Being Letters of Eminent Men to George Washington, from the Time of His Taking Command of the Army to the End of His Presidency, ed. Jared Sparks (Freeport, NY: Books for Libraries Press, 1853), 235–237. Original Sources, accessed August 17, 2022, http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=3UHGK5RURIQKGRB.

MLA: Hancock, John. "From the President of Congress." Correspondence of the American Revolution: Being Letters of Eminent Men to George Washington, from the Time of His Taking Command of the Army to the End of His Presidency, Vol. 1, in Correspondence of the American Revolution: Being Letters of Eminent Men to George Washington, from the Time of His Taking Command of the Army to the End of His Presidency, edited by Jared Sparks, Vol. 1, Freeport, NY, Books for Libraries Press, 1853, pp. 235–237. Original Sources. 17 Aug. 2022. http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=3UHGK5RURIQKGRB.

Harvard: Hancock, J, 'From the President of Congress.' in Correspondence of the American Revolution: Being Letters of Eminent Men to George Washington, from the Time of His Taking Command of the Army to the End of His Presidency, Vol. 1. cited in 1853, Correspondence of the American Revolution: Being Letters of Eminent Men to George Washington, from the Time of His Taking Command of the Army to the End of His Presidency, ed. , Books for Libraries Press, Freeport, NY, pp.235–237. Original Sources, retrieved 17 August 2022, from http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=3UHGK5RURIQKGRB.