Bantu Beliefs and Magic

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Among the Kikuyu, two men circumcised at the same ceremony cannot go into each other’s huts or even touch one another and neither may their children by their first wives. The prohibition may be removed by an exchange of goats, or beer, which both families consume together in a hut. This prohibition does not extend to children of younger wives or to grandchildren.3

3Hobley, C.W.n/an/an/an/a, , 87 (H. F. and G. Witherby. By permission).

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Chicago: "Bantu Beliefs and Magic," Bantu Beliefs and Magic in Primitive Behavior: An Introduction to the Social Sciences, ed. Thomas, William I. (New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc., 1937), Original Sources, accessed May 27, 2022, http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=3UVXZN2N39QAZA3.

MLA: . "Bantu Beliefs and Magic." Bantu Beliefs and Magic, in Primitive Behavior: An Introduction to the Social Sciences, edited by Thomas, William I., New York, McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc., 1937, Original Sources. 27 May. 2022. http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=3UVXZN2N39QAZA3.

Harvard: , 'Bantu Beliefs and Magic' in Bantu Beliefs and Magic. cited in 1937, Primitive Behavior: An Introduction to the Social Sciences, ed. , McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc., New York. Original Sources, retrieved 27 May 2022, from http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=3UVXZN2N39QAZA3.