Correspondence of the American Revolution: Being Letters of Eminent Men to George Washington, from the Time of His Taking Command of the Army to the End of His Presidency, Vol. 1

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Author: Charles Lee

U.S. History

From Major-General Lee.

Stamford, 24 January, 1776.

DEAR GENERAL,

It was unnecessary sooner to trouble you with my scrawl, as I could give you no information the least interesting. I find the people through this Province more alive and zealous than my most sanguine expectation. I believe I might have collected ten thousand volunteers. I take only four companies with me, and

Waterbury’s regiment, which is so happily situated on the frontier. Ward’s regiment I have ordered to remain at their respective homes, until they hear further. These Connecticutians are, if possible, more eager to go out of their country, than they are to return home, when they have been out for any considerable time.

Inclosed I send you my letter to the General Congress. That of the Provincial Congress of New York to me, with my answer, I hope will have your approbation.

The Whigs, I mean the stout ones, are, it is said, very desirous that a body of troops should march and be stationed in their city. The timid ones are averse, merely from the spirit of procrastination, which is the characteristic of timidity. The letter of the Provincial Congress, you will observe, breathes the very essence of this spirit. It is wofully hysterical. I conclude I shall receive the orders of the General Congress before, or immediately on, my arrival; otherwise I should not venture to march into the Province, as, by their late resolve, every detachment of the Continental troops is to be under the direction of the Provincial Congress in which they are; a resolve, I must say with submission to their wisdom, fraught with difficulties and evils. It is impossible, having two sovereigns, that any business should be carried on.

Have you seen the pamphlet, Common Sense? I never saw such a masterly, irresistible performance. It will, if I mistake not, in concurrence with the transcendent folly and wickedness of the ministry, give the coup-de-grace to Great Britain. In short, I own myself convinced by the arguments, of the necessity of separation. Poor brave Montgomery! But it it is not a time to cry, but to revenge. God bless you, my dear General, and crown us with the success I am sure we merit, from the goodness of our cause. My love to the ladies. I shall write a long letter to Gates, when I have time and materials. Adieu.

Yours, most affectionately,

CHARLES LEE.

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Chicago: Charles Lee, "From Major-General Lee.," Correspondence of the American Revolution: Being Letters of Eminent Men to George Washington, from the Time of His Taking Command of the Army to the End of His Presidency, Vol. 1 in Correspondence of the American Revolution: Being Letters of Eminent Men to George Washington, from the Time of His Taking Command of the Army to the End of His Presidency, ed. Jared Sparks (Freeport, NY: Books for Libraries Press, 1853), 135–137. Original Sources, accessed February 25, 2020, http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=48VUAKHRBVYW16K.

MLA: Lee, Charles. "From Major-General Lee." Correspondence of the American Revolution: Being Letters of Eminent Men to George Washington, from the Time of His Taking Command of the Army to the End of His Presidency, Vol. 1, in Correspondence of the American Revolution: Being Letters of Eminent Men to George Washington, from the Time of His Taking Command of the Army to the End of His Presidency, edited by Jared Sparks, Vol. 1, Freeport, NY, Books for Libraries Press, 1853, pp. 135–137. Original Sources. 25 Feb. 2020. www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=48VUAKHRBVYW16K.

Harvard: Lee, C, 'From Major-General Lee.' in Correspondence of the American Revolution: Being Letters of Eminent Men to George Washington, from the Time of His Taking Command of the Army to the End of His Presidency, Vol. 1. cited in 1853, Correspondence of the American Revolution: Being Letters of Eminent Men to George Washington, from the Time of His Taking Command of the Army to the End of His Presidency, ed. , Books for Libraries Press, Freeport, NY, pp.135–137. Original Sources, retrieved 25 February 2020, from http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=48VUAKHRBVYW16K.