A Dictionary of American History

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Author: Thomas L. Purvis  | Date: 1995

Concurrent Majority

Concurrent Majority In his “Disquisition on Government” (1843), John Calhoun argued that a historical weakness of democracies was their tendency to degenerate into the oppression of regional or class interests by numerical majorities. To prevent the popular will of a northern majority turning despotic against the southern minority, he advocated a constitutional amendment to create a dual executive, with one president elected by the free states and another by the slave states, and to require that no bill become federal law without the signature of both.

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Chicago: Thomas L. Purvis, "Concurrent Majority," A Dictionary of American History in A Dictionary of American History (Cambridge, Mass.: Blackwell Reference, 1995), Original Sources, accessed September 25, 2022, http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=4AW2REP37JJY2VU.

MLA: Purvis, Thomas L. "Concurrent Majority." A Dictionary of American History, in A Dictionary of American History, Cambridge, Mass., Blackwell Reference, 1995, Original Sources. 25 Sep. 2022. http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=4AW2REP37JJY2VU.

Harvard: Purvis, TL, 'Concurrent Majority' in A Dictionary of American History. cited in 1995, A Dictionary of American History, Blackwell Reference, Cambridge, Mass.. Original Sources, retrieved 25 September 2022, from http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=4AW2REP37JJY2VU.