Politics

Contents:
Author: Aristotle  | Date: 350 BC

X

And we have found the answer to our original question, Whether the art of getting wealth is the business of the manager of a household and of the statesman or not their business? viz., that wealth is presupposed by them. For as political science does not make men, but takes them from nature and uses them, so too nature provides them with earth or sea or the like as a source of food. At this stage begins the duty of the manager of a household, who has to order the things which nature supplies; he may be compared to the weaver who has not to make but to use wool, and to know, too, what sort of wool is good and serviceable or bad and unserviceable. Were this otherwise, it would be difficult to see why the art of getting wealth is a part of the management of a household and the art of medicine not; for surely the members of a household must have health just as they must have life or any other necessary. The answer is that as from one point of view the master of the house and the ruler of the state have to consider about health, from another point of view not they but the physician; so in one way the art of household management, in another way the subordinate art, has to consider about wealth. But, strictly speaking, as I have already said, the means of life must be provided beforehand by nature; for the business of nature is to furnish food to that which is born, and the food of the offspring is always what remains over of that from which it is produced. Wherefore the art of getting wealth out of fruits and animals is always natural.

There are two sorts of wealth-getting, as I have said; one is a part of household management, the other is retail trade: the former necessary and honorable, while that which consists in exchange is justly censured; for it is unnatural, and a mode by which men gain from one another. The most hated sort, and with the greatest reason, is usury, which makes a gain out of money itself, and not from the natural object of it. For money was intended to be used in exchange, but not to increase at interest. And this term interest, *005 which means the birth of money from money, is applied to the breeding of money because the offspring resembles the parent. Wherefore of all modes of getting wealth this is the most unnatural.

Contents:

Download Options


Title: Politics

Select an option:

*Note: A download may not start for up to 60 seconds.

Email Options


Title: Politics

Select an option:

Email addres:

*Note: It may take up to 60 seconds for for the email to be generated.

Chicago: Aristotle, "X," Politics, trans. Benjamin Jowett Original Sources, accessed July 20, 2024, http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=4AX5S5LNMCM7LCA.

MLA: Aristotle. "X." Politics, translted by Benjamin Jowett, Original Sources. 20 Jul. 2024. http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=4AX5S5LNMCM7LCA.

Harvard: Aristotle, 'X' in Politics, trans. . Original Sources, retrieved 20 July 2024, from http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=4AX5S5LNMCM7LCA.