The High History of the Holy Graal

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Author: Unknown

XII.

When Galobruns heareth that he is his uncle’s son, great joy hath he thereof. He would have fallen at his feet, but Perceval would not, and said to him, "Now be well assured, for I will seek your deliverance."

He cometh down from the rock, and so entereth the ship and roweth of a long space. He looketh before him and seeth a right rich island and a right plenteous, and on the other side he seeth in a little islet a knight that is mounted up in a tall tree that was right broad with many boughs. There was a damsel with him, that had climbed up also for dread of a serpent, great and evilfavoured that had issued from a hole in a mountain. The damsel seeth Perceval’s ship coming, and crieth out to him.

"Ha, Sir," saith she, "Come to help this King that is up above, and me that am a damsel!"

"Whereof are you afeard, damsel?" saith Perceval.

"Of a great serpent, Sir," saith she, "that hath made us climb up, whereof ought I not to be sorry, for this King hath carried me off from my father’s house, and would have done me shame of my body and this serpent had not run upon him."

"And what is the King’s name, damsel?" saith Perceval.

"Sir, he is called Gohaz of the Castle of the Whale. This great land is his own that is so plenteous, and other lands enow that he hath reft of my father and of other."

The King had great shame of this that the damsel told him, and made answer never a word. Perceval understandeth that it was he that held his cousin in prison, and is issued from the ship forthwith, sword drawn. The serpent seeth him, and cometh toward him, jaws yawning, and casteth forth fire and flame in great plenty. Perceval thrusteth his sword right through the gullet.

"Now may you come down," saith he to the King.

"Sir," saith he, "The key of a chain wherewith a certain knight is bound hath fallen, and the serpent seized it."

Perceval rendeth open the throat and findeth the key forthwith, all red-hot with the fire of the serpent. The King cometh down, that hath no dread of aught, but cometh, rather, as he ought, to thank Perceval of the goodness he had done him, and Perceval seizeth him between his arms and beareth him away to the ship.

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Chicago: Unknown, "12," The High History of the Holy Graal, trans. Evans, Sebastian in The High History of the Holy Graal Original Sources, accessed January 23, 2020, http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=4KKP6HQIB7ZP4HC.

MLA: Unknown. "12." The High History of the Holy Graal, translted by Evans, Sebastian, in The High History of the Holy Graal, Original Sources. 23 Jan. 2020. www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=4KKP6HQIB7ZP4HC.

Harvard: Unknown, '12' in The High History of the Holy Graal, trans. . cited in , The High History of the Holy Graal. Original Sources, retrieved 23 January 2020, from http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=4KKP6HQIB7ZP4HC.