American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 1

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Author: Noah Webster

Gird

GIRD, n. gurd. [Eng. a yard.]

1. A twitch or pang; a sudden spasm, which resembles the stroke of a rod or the pressure of a band.

2. In popular language, a severe stroke of a stick or whip.

GIRD, v.t. gurd. pret. and pp. girded or girt.

1. To bind by surrounding with any flexible substance, as with a twig, a cord, bandage or cloth; as, to gird the loins with sackcloth.

2. To make fast by binding; to put on; usually with on; as, to gird on a harness; to gird on a sword.

3. To invest; to surround.

The Son appeared,

Girt with omnipotence.

4. To clothe; to dress; to habit.

I girded thee about with fine linen. Ezek 16.

5. To furnish; to equip.

Girded with snaky wiles.

6. To surround; to encircle; to inclose; to encompass.

The Nyseian isle,

Girt with the river Triton.

7. To gibe; to reproach severly; to lash.

GIRD, v.i. To gibe; to sneer; to break a scornful jest; to utter severe sarcasms.

Men of all sorts take a pride to gird at me.

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Chicago: Noah Webster Jr., "Gird," American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 1 in An American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 1 (New York: S. Converse, 1828), Original Sources, accessed August 8, 2022, http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=4LGVPC138QHPG8D.

MLA: Webster, Noah, Jr. "Gird." American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 1, in An American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 1, New York, S. Converse, 1828, Original Sources. 8 Aug. 2022. http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=4LGVPC138QHPG8D.

Harvard: Webster, N, 'Gird' in American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 1. cited in 1828, An American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 1, S. Converse, New York. Original Sources, retrieved 8 August 2022, from http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=4LGVPC138QHPG8D.