Howard Pyle’s Book of Pirates; Fiction, Fact & Fancy Concerning the Buccaneers & Marooners of the Spanish Main

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Author: Howard Pyle

V

The balance of our hero’s adventures were of a lighter sort than those already recounted, for the next morning the Spanish captain (a very polite and well-bred gentleman) having fitted him out with a shift of his own clothes, Master Harry was presented in a proper form to the ladies. For Captain Morgan, if he had felt a liking for the young man before, could not now show sufficient regard for him. He ate in the great cabin and was petted by all. Madam Simon, who was a fat and red-faced lady, was forever praising him, and the young miss, who was extremely welllooking, was as continually making eyes at him.

She and Master Harry, I must tell you, would spend hours together, she making pretense of teaching him French, although he was so possessed with a passion of love that he was nigh suffocated with it. She, upon her part, perceiving his emotions, responded with extreme good nature and complacency, so that had our hero been older, and the voyage proved longer, he might have become entirely enmeshed in the toils of his fair siren. For all this while, you are to understand, the pirates were making sail straight for Jamaica, which they reached upon the third day in perfect safety.

In that time, however, the pirates had well-nigh gone crazy for joy; for when they came to examine their purchase they discovered her cargo to consist of plate to the prodigious sum of L180,000 in value. ’Twas a wonder they did not all make themselves drunk for joy. No doubt they would have done so had not Captain Morgan, knowing they were still in the exact track of the Spanish fleets, threatened them that the first man among them who touched a drop of rum without his permission he would shoot him dead upon the deck. This threat had such effect that they all remained entirely sober until they had reached Port Royal Harbor, which they did about nine o’clock in the morning.

And now it was that our hero’s romance came all tumbling down about his ears with a run. For they had hardly come to anchor in the harbor when a boat came from a man-of-war, and who should come stepping aboard but Lieutenant Grantley (a particular friend of our hero’s father) and his own eldest brother Thomas, who, putting on a very stern face, informed Master Harry that he was a desperate and hardened villain who was sure to end at the gallows, and that he was to go immediately back to his home again. He told our embryo pirate that his family had nigh gone distracted because of his wicked and ungrateful conduct. Nor could our hero move him from his inflexible purpose. "What," says our Harry, "and will you not then let me wait until our prize is divided and I get my share?"

"Prize, indeed!" says his brother. "And do you then really think that your father would consent to your having a share in this terrible bloody and murthering business?"

And so, after a good deal of argument, our hero was constrained to go; nor did he even have an opportunity to bid adieu to his inamorata. Nor did he see her any more, except from a distance, she standing on the poop deck as he was rowed away from her, her face all stained with crying. For himself, he felt that there was no more joy in life; nevertheless, standing up in the stern of the boat, he made shift, though with an aching heart, to deliver her a fine bow with the hat he had borrowed from the Spanish captain, before his brother bade him sit down again.

And so to the ending of this story, with only this to relate, that our Master Harry, so far from going to the gallows, became in good time a respectable and wealthy sugar merchant with an English wife and a fine family of children, whereunto, when the mood was upon him, he has sometimes told these adventures (and sundry others not here recounted), as I have told them unto you.

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Chicago: Howard Pyle, "V," Howard Pyle’s Book of Pirates; Fiction, Fact & Fancy Concerning the Buccaneers & Marooners of the Spanish Main, ed. Altemus, Henry in Howard Pyle’s Book of Pirates; Fiction, Fact & Fancy Concerning the Buccaneers & Marooners of the Spanish Main Original Sources, accessed August 9, 2022, http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=4TQRQIIFH1C2H39.

MLA: Pyle, Howard. "V." Howard Pyle’s Book of Pirates; Fiction, Fact & Fancy Concerning the Buccaneers & Marooners of the Spanish Main, edited by Altemus, Henry, in Howard Pyle’s Book of Pirates; Fiction, Fact & Fancy Concerning the Buccaneers & Marooners of the Spanish Main, Original Sources. 9 Aug. 2022. http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=4TQRQIIFH1C2H39.

Harvard: Pyle, H, 'V' in Howard Pyle’s Book of Pirates; Fiction, Fact & Fancy Concerning the Buccaneers & Marooners of the Spanish Main, ed. . cited in , Howard Pyle’s Book of Pirates; Fiction, Fact & Fancy Concerning the Buccaneers & Marooners of the Spanish Main. Original Sources, retrieved 9 August 2022, from http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=4TQRQIIFH1C2H39.