American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 2

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Author: Noah Webster

Leak

LEAK, n. [Gr. a fissure or crevice, L. lacero and loquor, and perhaps Eng. clack. It seems that licerish is from the root of leak, and signifies properly watery.]

1. A crack, crevice, fissure or hole in a vessel, that admits water, or permits a fluid to escape.

2. The oozing or passing of water or other fluid or liquor through a crack, fissure or aperture in a vessel, either into it, as into a ship, or out of it, as out of a cask.

To spring a leak, is to open or crack so as to let in water; to being to let in water.

LEAK, a. Leaky. [Not in use.]

LEAK, v.i. To let water or other liquor into or out of a vessel, through a hole or crevice in the vessel. A ship leaks, when she admits water through her seams or an aperture in her bottom or sides, into the hull. A pail or a cask leaks, when it admits liquor to pass out through a hole or crevice.

To lead out, to find vent; to escape privately from confinement or secrecy; as a fact or report.

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Chicago: Noah Webster Jr., "Leak," American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 2 in An American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 2 (New York: S. Converse, 1828), Original Sources, accessed August 7, 2022, http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=4VP6IGZ5DFG8XQY.

MLA: Webster, Noah, Jr. "Leak." American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 2, in An American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 2, New York, S. Converse, 1828, Original Sources. 7 Aug. 2022. http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=4VP6IGZ5DFG8XQY.

Harvard: Webster, N, 'Leak' in American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 2. cited in 1828, An American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 2, S. Converse, New York. Original Sources, retrieved 7 August 2022, from http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=4VP6IGZ5DFG8XQY.