Source Problems on the French Revolution

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7. Bailli De Virieu, Correspondance, 144.

The news of the arrival of the king and the royal family was known in Paris long before noon. All the population betook itself to the road to Versailles, in spite of the mud and the rain, to greet its sovereign the sooner. First of all there came into sight an enormous number of carts, upon which lolled fish-wives pell-mell with soldiers, bearing in their hands branches of trees from which hung tri-colored ribbons. Discharges of musketry were heard all along the road. Then came many wagons loaded with sacks of flour, then soldiers on horseback, etc. The king arrived in person at eight o’clock in the evening. The streets were illuminated, and his march was similar to that of Friday, July 17 [1789]. The body guard marched with the other soldiers and no longer wore their cross-belts; many had on their heads the bonnets of the grenadiers; some were on horseback, the others on foot; all shouted, "Long live the nation!" and brandished their swords and their hats in salutation. They would have been torn in pieces if the king had not required them to take the oath of fidelity to the nation. There were in the royal coach the king, the queen, the dauphin, madame (his sister), the Count and the Countess of Provence. Around them the cry was raised: "Here is the baker and the baker’s wife and the little baker’s boy! We shall no longer lack bread!" The mayor, who had gone to the barrier of the conference to present to the king the keys of the city of Paris, marched before the carriage of their majesties. The latter having gone into the city hall, M. Bailly spoke to the members of the commune in the names of the royal persons, and assured them that the king and the queen, as well as their family, came to put themselves in the hands of the people with pleasure. "And confidence," immediately cried out the sovereigns. "It is fortunate I forgot this word," added the mayor, immediately, "because, coming from the mouth of the king, it ought to be still more dear to his subjects."

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Chicago: "7. Bailli De Virieu, Correspondance, 144," Source Problems on the French Revolution in Source Problems on the French Revolution, ed. Fred Morrow Fling and Helene Dresser Fling (New York: Harper & Brothers Publishers, 1913), 246–248. Original Sources, accessed January 26, 2023, http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=8DH631A4CKDZ4L7.

MLA: . "7. Bailli De Virieu, Correspondance, 144." Source Problems on the French Revolution, in Source Problems on the French Revolution, edited by Fred Morrow Fling and Helene Dresser Fling, New York, Harper & Brothers Publishers, 1913, pp. 246–248. Original Sources. 26 Jan. 2023. http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=8DH631A4CKDZ4L7.

Harvard: , '7. Bailli De Virieu, Correspondance, 144' in Source Problems on the French Revolution. cited in 1913, Source Problems on the French Revolution, ed. , Harper & Brothers Publishers, New York, pp.246–248. Original Sources, retrieved 26 January 2023, from http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=8DH631A4CKDZ4L7.