A Dictionary of American History

Contents:
Author: Thomas L. Purvis  | Date: 1995

Tuskegee Syphilis Scandal

Tuskegee Syphilis Scandal From 1932 to 1972, US Public Health Service doctors diagnosed over 500 blacks living near Tuskegee, Ala., as having contracted syphilis, but purposefully kept the patients ignorant of their condition for the sake of conducting a secret, clinical study of the long-term effects of leaving the disease untreated by antibiotics. The experiment ended abruptly when the Washington Star exposed it on 25 July 1972, but by then over 100 of the subjects had died of the disease or related complications. In December 1974, an out-of-court settlement paid $10 million to the study’s 120 survivors, to persons who contracted syphilis from them, and to heirs of the deceased.

Contents:

Related Resources

None available for this document.

Download Options


Title: A Dictionary of American History

Select an option:

*Note: A download may not start for up to 60 seconds.

Email Options


Title: A Dictionary of American History

Select an option:

Email addres:

*Note: It may take up to 60 seconds for for the email to be generated.

Chicago: Thomas L. Purvis, "Tuskegee Syphilis Scandal," A Dictionary of American History in A Dictionary of American History (Cambridge, Mass.: Blackwell Reference, 1995), Original Sources, accessed February 4, 2023, http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=9416EQ7GJ46YS6F.

MLA: Purvis, Thomas L. "Tuskegee Syphilis Scandal." A Dictionary of American History, in A Dictionary of American History, Cambridge, Mass., Blackwell Reference, 1995, Original Sources. 4 Feb. 2023. http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=9416EQ7GJ46YS6F.

Harvard: Purvis, TL, 'Tuskegee Syphilis Scandal' in A Dictionary of American History. cited in 1995, A Dictionary of American History, Blackwell Reference, Cambridge, Mass.. Original Sources, retrieved 4 February 2023, from http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=9416EQ7GJ46YS6F.