Select Epigrams from the Greek Anthology

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Author: Unknown

XXXVII
THE WORLD’S WORTH AESOPUS

How might one escape thee, O life, without dying? for thy sorrows are numberless, and neither escape nor endurance is easy. For sweet indeed are thy beautiful things of nature, earth, sea, stars, the orbs of moon and sun; but all else is fears and pains, and though one have a good thing befal him, there succeeds it an answering Nemesis.

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Chicago: Unknown, "XXXVII the World’s Worth Aesopus," Select Epigrams from the Greek Anthology, ed. Sutherland, Alexander, 1853-1902 and trans. Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945 in Select Epigrams from the Greek Anthology (New York: George E. Wood, ""Death-bed"" edition, 1892), Original Sources, accessed February 7, 2023, http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=95GEAD5DNBV6FFH.

MLA: Unknown. "XXXVII the World’s Worth Aesopus." Select Epigrams from the Greek Anthology, edited by Sutherland, Alexander, 1853-1902, and translated by Mackail, J. W. (John William), 1859-1945, in Select Epigrams from the Greek Anthology, New York, George E. Wood, ""Death-bed"" edition, 1892, Original Sources. 7 Feb. 2023. http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=95GEAD5DNBV6FFH.

Harvard: Unknown, 'XXXVII the World’s Worth Aesopus' in Select Epigrams from the Greek Anthology, ed. and trans. . cited in ""Death-bed"" edition, 1892, Select Epigrams from the Greek Anthology, George E. Wood, New York. Original Sources, retrieved 7 February 2023, from http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=95GEAD5DNBV6FFH.