American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 1

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Author: Noah Webster

Ish

ISH, a termination of English words,is, in Sax. isc. Dan.isk, G. isch; and not improbably, it is the termination esque, in French, as in grotesque, It.esco, in grotesco, and the Latin termination of the inceptive verb, as in fervesco. Annexed to English adjectives, ish denotes diminutive, or a small degree of the quality; as whitish, from white; yellowish, from yellow.

ISH annexed to names forms a possessive adjective; as in Swedish, Danish, English.

ISH annexed to common nouns forms an adjective denoting a participation of the qualities expressed by the noun; as foolish, from fool; roguish, from rogue; brutish, from brute. This is the more common use of this termination.

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Chicago: Noah Webster Jr., "Ish," American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 1 in An American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 1 (New York: S. Converse, 1828), Original Sources, accessed February 9, 2023, http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=9ER4FIKU6RGVYC7.

MLA: Webster, Noah, Jr. "Ish." American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 1, in An American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 1, New York, S. Converse, 1828, Original Sources. 9 Feb. 2023. http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=9ER4FIKU6RGVYC7.

Harvard: Webster, N, 'Ish' in American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 1. cited in 1828, An American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 1, S. Converse, New York. Original Sources, retrieved 9 February 2023, from http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=9ER4FIKU6RGVYC7.