Public Papers of Lyndon B. Johnson, 1965

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Author: Lyndon B. Johnson  | Date: February 1, 1965

38
Statement by the President Upon Establishing the Job Development Program.
February 1, 1965

UNEMPLOYMENT in America stands at almost 5 percent. Yet we face the paradox that with nearly 4 million people unemployed,

—it often takes weeks to have an appliance or other repair made,

—hospitals and many other community services are understaffed,

—housewives cannot get the help they seek for work in the home or in the yard,

—we have been admitting almost 200,000 foreign workers annually because American workers were not considered available, and

` —the papers are full of help wanted ads.

I am convinced that a substantial number of jobs can be developed from such presently existing and unmet service needs—in business, at home, on the farm, and in the community.

Therefore, I am launching a nationwide job development program in service and related fields:

—to assure that trained workers are available to provide needed services at satisfactory wages and working conditions,

—to assure that managerial skills are developed to provide these services as part of our free enterprise system,

—to assure that consumer needs are met better and more fully.

The Secretary of Labor and the Secretary of Commerce are charged with responsibility for carrying this program forward. They are to work with other Federal, State, and local agencies and to enlist the fullest possible private participation in the planning and operation of this program.

Government can make a great contribution:

—by assembling information about job opportunities, unmet needs, and available manpower,

—by promoting institutional and on-thejob training and apprenticeship,

—by providing technical assistance to management,

—by stimulating new enterprises through small business loans and in other ways.

But ultimate success will depend on the resourcefulness and cooperation of business, labor, and consumer groups. In many cases training and other parts of this program can best be arranged by joint labor-management committees.

By July 1, 1965, this job development program should reach 10,000 jobs a month.

This initial 5-month stage can be accomplished under existing law. It will be supported out of funds already appropriated or requested in my Budget Message.

I will also propose to the Congress the adoption of legislation by amendment of the Manpower Development and Training Act and in, if necessary, other appropriate ways which will give this program the broadest and firmest possible basis.

For I mean to press far beyond this initial stage. Our service needs are increasing and will continue to do so—reflecting the growing proportion of consumer spending that goes to services as incomes rise. We must meet this demand and realize fully its employment potential.

But this will not be an easy task.

We will need to provide many of the presently unemployed with the basic training-and education—which these service jobs require.

Our present information about existing and potential job opportunities must be greatly increased.

New ways of providing home and communityservices must be explored.

Difficult management problems in filling what are often part-time—or seasonal—jobs must be solved.

Better means of transportation between unemployed workers and jobs—either within a large city, or between the agricultural areas in the country where various peak demands occur—need to be developed.

Many of these prospective jobs are with small employers, so greater efforts must be made to work with trade associations and similar groups.

There are two other problems which have prevented a more rapid expansion of service employment—low wage rates and an attitude that much service work lacks dignity.

This job development program must be so administered that it does not undercut present wage or other work standards. It should contribute to raising these standards and to recognition of the importance and value of all service work.

But these problems can all be met. They must be met if we are to advance toward our goal of full employment opportunity in America.

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Chicago: Lyndon B. Johnson, "38 Statement by the President Upon Establishing the Job Development Program.," Public Papers of Lyndon B. Johnson, 1965 in Federal Register Division. National Archives and Records Service, Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States, Lyndon B. Johnson, 1965 (Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1956-), P.1168 121. Original Sources, accessed July 23, 2024, http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=H6NN7ZMDEBTC27N.

MLA: Johnson, Lyndon B. "38 Statement by the President Upon Establishing the Job Development Program." Public Papers of Lyndon B. Johnson, 1965, in Federal Register Division. National Archives and Records Service, Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States, Lyndon B. Johnson, 1965 (Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1956-), P.1168, page 121. Original Sources. 23 Jul. 2024. http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=H6NN7ZMDEBTC27N.

Harvard: Johnson, LB, '38 Statement by the President Upon Establishing the Job Development Program.' in Public Papers of Lyndon B. Johnson, 1965. cited in , Federal Register Division. National Archives and Records Service, Public Papers of the Presidents of the United States, Lyndon B. Johnson, 1965 (Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1956-), P.1168, pp.121. Original Sources, retrieved 23 July 2024, from http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=H6NN7ZMDEBTC27N.