Till He Come

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Author: Charles Haddon Spurgeon

Under the Apple Tree

"I sat down under His shadow with great delight,
and His fruit was sweet to my taste."
— Solomon’s Song 2:3.

Christ known should be Christ used. The spouse knew her Beloved to be like a fruit-bearing tree, and at once she sat under His shadow, and fed upon His fruit. It is a pity that we know so much about Christ, and yet enjoy Him so little. May our experience keep pace with our knowledge, and may that experience be composed of a practical using of our Lord! Jesus casts a shadow, let us sit under it: Jesus yields fruit, let us taste the sweetness of it. Depend upon it that the way to learn more is to use what you know; and, moreover, the way to learn a truth thoroughly is to learn it experimentally. You know a doctrine beyond all fear of contradiction when you have proved it for yourself by personal test and trial. The bride in the song as good as says, "I am certain that my Beloved casts a shadow, for I have sat under it, and I am persuaded that He bears sweet fruit, for I have tasted of it." The best way of demonstrating the power of Christ to save is to trust in Him and be saved yourself; and of all those who are sure of the divinity of our holy faith, there are none so certain as those who feel its divine power upon themselves. You may reason yourself into a belief of the gospel, and you may by further reasoning keep yourself orthodox; but a personal trial, and an inward knowing of the truth, are incomparably the best evidences. If Jesus be as an apple tree among the trees of the wood, do not keep away from Him, but sit under His shadow, and taste His fruit. He is a Savior; do not believe the fact and yet remain unsaved. As far as Christ is known to you, so far make use of Him. Is not this sound common-sense?

We would further remark that we are at liberty to make every possible use of Christ. Shadow and fruit may both be enjoyed. Christ in His infinite condescension exists for needy souls. Oh, let us say it over again: it is a bold word, but it is true, — as Christ Jesus, our Lord exists for the benefit of His people. A Savior only exists to save. A physician lives to heal. The Good Shepherd lives, yea, dies, for His sheep. Our Lord Jesus Christ hath wrapped us about His heart; we are intimately interwoven with all His offices, with all His honors, with all His traits of character, with all that He has done, and with all that He has yet to do. The ’sinners’ Friend lives for sinners, and sinners may have Him and use Him to the uttermost. He is as free to us as the air we breathe. What are fountains for, but that the thirsty may drink? What is the harbour for but that storm-tossed barques may there find refuge? What is Christ for but that poor guilty ones like ourselves may come to Him and look and live, and afterwards may have all our needs supplied out of His fulness?

We have thus the door set open for us, and we pray that the Holy Spirit may help us to enter in while we notice in the text two things which we pray that you may enjoy to the full. First, the heart’s rest in Christ: "I sat down under His shadow with great delight." And, secondly, the heart’s refreshment in Christ: "His fruit was sweet to my taste."

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Chicago: Charles Haddon Spurgeon, "Under the Apple Tree," Till He Come in Till He Come: Communion Meditations and Addresses (London: Passmore & Alabaster, 1894), Original Sources, accessed September 30, 2022, http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=KPRZUVSUUK37TGF.

MLA: Spurgeon, Charles Haddon. "Under the Apple Tree." Till He Come, in Till He Come: Communion Meditations and Addresses, London, Passmore & Alabaster, 1894, Original Sources. 30 Sep. 2022. http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=KPRZUVSUUK37TGF.

Harvard: Spurgeon, CH, 'Under the Apple Tree' in Till He Come. cited in 1894, Till He Come: Communion Meditations and Addresses, Passmore & Alabaster, London. Original Sources, retrieved 30 September 2022, from http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=KPRZUVSUUK37TGF.