Battle of the Books and Other Short Pieces

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Author: Jonathan Swift

Chapter XI - The First He Wrote Oct. 17, 1727.

MOST merciful Father, accept our humblest prayers in behalf of this Thy languishing servant; forgive the sins, the frailties, and infirmities of her life past. Accept the good deeds she hath done in such a manner that, at whatever time Thou shalt please to call her, she may be received into everlasting habitations. Give her grace to continue sincerely thankful to Thee for the many favours Thou hast bestowed upon her, the ability and inclination and practice to do good, and those virtues which have procured the esteem and love of her friends, and a most unspotted name in the world. O God, Thou dispensest Thy blessings and Thy punishments, as it becometh infinite justice and mercy; and since it was Thy pleasure to afflict her with a long, constant, weakly state of health, make her truly sensible that it was for very wise ends, and was largely made up to her in other blessings, more valuable and less common. Continue to her, O Lord, that firmness and constancy of mind wherewith Thou hast most graciously endowed her, together with that contempt of worldly things and vanities that she hath shown in the whole conduct of her life. O All-powerful Being, the least motion of whose Will can create or destroy a world, pity us, the mournful friends of Thy distressed servant, who sink under the weight of her present condition, and the fear of losing the most valuable of our friends; restore her to us, O Lord, if it be Thy gracious Will, or inspire us with constancy and resignation to support ourselves under so heavy an affliction. Restore her, O Lord, for the sake of those poor, who by losing her will be desolate, and those sick, who will not only want her bounty, but her care and tending; or else, in Thy mercy, raise up some other in her place with equal disposition and better abilities. Lessen, O Lord, we beseech thee, her bodily pains, or give her a double strength of mind to support them. And if Thou wilt soon take her to Thyself, turn our thoughts rather upon that felicity which we hope she shall enjoy, than upon that unspeakable loss we shall endure. Let her memory be ever dear unto us, and the example of her many virtues, as far as human infirmity will admit, our constant imitation. Accept, O Lord, these prayers poured from the very bottom of our hearts, in Thy mercy, and for the merits of our blessed Saviour. AMEN.

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Chicago: Jonathan Swift, "Chapter XI - The First He Wrote Oct. 17, 1727.," Battle of the Books and Other Short Pieces, ed. Macaulay, G. C. (George Campbell), 1852-1915 and trans. Curtin, Jeremiah, 1835-1906 in Battle of the Books and Other Short Pieces Original Sources, accessed October 4, 2022, http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=KQVZHFSAEM4S8J7.

MLA: Swift, Jonathan. "Chapter XI - The First He Wrote Oct. 17, 1727." Battle of the Books and Other Short Pieces, edited by Macaulay, G. C. (George Campbell), 1852-1915, and translated by Curtin, Jeremiah, 1835-1906, in Battle of the Books and Other Short Pieces, Original Sources. 4 Oct. 2022. http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=KQVZHFSAEM4S8J7.

Harvard: Swift, J, 'Chapter XI - The First He Wrote Oct. 17, 1727.' in Battle of the Books and Other Short Pieces, ed. and trans. . cited in 1911, Battle of the Books and Other Short Pieces. Original Sources, retrieved 4 October 2022, from http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=KQVZHFSAEM4S8J7.