American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 1

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Author: Noah Webster

Flowk

FLOWK,

FLOWN, had fled, in the following phrases, is not good English.

Was reason flown.

Sons of Belial, flown with insolence and wine.

In the former passage, flown is used as the participle of fly or flee, both intransitive verbs, and the phrase should have been, had reason flown or fled. In the latter passage, flown is used for blown, inflated, but most improperly. Flown is the participle of the perfect or past tense of fly, but cannot regularly be used in a passive sense.

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Chicago: Noah Webster Jr., "Flowk," American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 1 in An American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 1 (New York: S. Converse, 1828), Original Sources, accessed October 1, 2022, http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=L1YMGVJW4BJEA99.

MLA: Webster, Noah, Jr. "Flowk." American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 1, in An American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 1, New York, S. Converse, 1828, Original Sources. 1 Oct. 2022. http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=L1YMGVJW4BJEA99.

Harvard: Webster, N, 'Flowk' in American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 1. cited in 1828, An American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 1, S. Converse, New York. Original Sources, retrieved 1 October 2022, from http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=L1YMGVJW4BJEA99.