American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 2

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Author: Noah Webster

Metonymy

MET’ONYMY, n. [Gr. over, beyond, and name.] In rhetoric, a trope in which one word is put for another; a change of names which have some relation to each other; as when we say, a man keeps a good table. instead of good provisions. We read Virgil. that is, his poems or writings. They have Moses and the prophets, that is, their books or writings. A man has a clear head, that is, understanding, intellect; a warm heart, that is affections.

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Chicago: Noah Webster Jr., "Metonymy," American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 2 in An American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 2 (New York: S. Converse, 1828), Original Sources, accessed September 25, 2022, http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=L2KDIBF1276NNRU.

MLA: Webster, Noah, Jr. "Metonymy." American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 2, in An American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 2, New York, S. Converse, 1828, Original Sources. 25 Sep. 2022. http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=L2KDIBF1276NNRU.

Harvard: Webster, N, 'Metonymy' in American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 2. cited in 1828, An American Dictionary of the English Language, Vol. 2, S. Converse, New York. Original Sources, retrieved 25 September 2022, from http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=L2KDIBF1276NNRU.