A Dictionary of American History

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Author: Thomas L. Purvis  | Date: 1995

Homestead Strike

Homestead Strike On 30 June 1892, the Carnegie Steel Co. locked out 3,800 workers from its Homestead, Pa., works after they refused to accept wage cuts of 18–26 percent. On 6 July, strikers fought with 300 armed Pinkerton detectives hired by the company; three detectives and seven strikers died. On 12 July, 8,000 militia arrived to keep peace, and on 23 July an immigrant anarchist shot plant manager Henry Frick. By hiring scabs, evicting strikers from company-owned housing, and filing legal charges against many workers, the Carnegie Co. broke the Amalgamated Association of Iron and Steel Workers by November. This victory enabled the firm (and its successor, US Steel) to prevent its workers from forming an effective union until the 1930s.

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Chicago: Thomas L. Purvis, "Homestead Strike," A Dictionary of American History in A Dictionary of American History (Cambridge, Mass.: Blackwell Reference, 1995), Original Sources, accessed October 1, 2022, http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=LHZK7G68T55LGFV.

MLA: Purvis, Thomas L. "Homestead Strike." A Dictionary of American History, in A Dictionary of American History, Cambridge, Mass., Blackwell Reference, 1995, Original Sources. 1 Oct. 2022. http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=LHZK7G68T55LGFV.

Harvard: Purvis, TL, 'Homestead Strike' in A Dictionary of American History. cited in 1995, A Dictionary of American History, Blackwell Reference, Cambridge, Mass.. Original Sources, retrieved 1 October 2022, from http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=LHZK7G68T55LGFV.