Nicomachean Ethics

Contents:
Author: Aristotle  | Date: 350 BC

6

Scientific knowledge is judgement about things that are universal and necessary, and the conclusions of demonstration, and all scientific knowledge, follow from first principles (for scientific knowledge involves apprehension of a rational ground). This being so, the first principle from which what is scientifically known follows cannot be an object of scientific knowledge, of art, or of practical wisdom; for that which can be scientifically known can be demonstrated, and art and practical wisdom deal with things that are variable. Nor are these first principles the objects of philosophic wisdom, for it is a mark of the philosopher to have demonstration about some things. If, then, the states of mind by which we have truth and are never deceived about things invariable or even variable are scientific knowlededge, practical wisdom, philosophic wisdom, and intuitive reason, and it cannot be any of the three (i.e. practical wisdom, scientific knowledge, or philosophic wisdom), the remaining alternative is that it is intuitive reason that grasps the first principles.

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Chicago: Aristotle, "6," Nicomachean Ethics, trans. W. D. Ross Original Sources, accessed October 1, 2022, http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=LIA3EYYFZGCMWDX.

MLA: Aristotle. "6." Nicomachean Ethics, translted by W. D. Ross, Original Sources. 1 Oct. 2022. http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=LIA3EYYFZGCMWDX.

Harvard: Aristotle, '6' in Nicomachean Ethics, trans. . Original Sources, retrieved 1 October 2022, from http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=LIA3EYYFZGCMWDX.