A Guide to the Study of the United States of America - Supplement

Contents:

M. Labor: General

2724. Barbash, Jack. Labor’s grass roots; a study of the local union. New York, Harper [1961]250 p. 61–14839 HD6508.B352

Bibliographical footnotes.

A composite picture of the internal government of local unions. After presenting the governmental structure as a whole, the author analyzes each of the major working parts and discusses the roles of the business agent, the steward, and the rank and file worker. The Worker Views His Union ([Chicago] University of Chicago Press [1958] 299. p.), by Joel I. Seidman and others, includes many excerpts from interviews with workers.

2725. Barbash, Jack, ed. Unions and union leadership: their human meaning. New York, Harper [1959] xxii, 348 p. 59–9937 HD6508–B354

Bibliographical footnotes.

A collection of writings relating the union to contemporary industrial society and emphasizing the ordinary, "non-glamorous" aspects of the union experience. To ensure a balanced presentation, the editor includes essays by such academic writers as Selig Perlman, Daniel Bell, and Irving Bernstein along with articles by labor reporters. The volume encompasses a broad view of the American labor movement, biographies of labor leaders, discussions of styles of unionism, and analyses of problems encountered by labor in society today. In Intellectuals in the Labor Unions; Organizational Pressures on Professional Roles (Glencoe, Ill., Free Press [1956] 336 p.), Harold L. Wilensky appraises the functions and influences of intellectuals in the unions and their role in the decision-making process.

2726. Dulles, Foster Rhea. Labor in America, a history. 2d rev. ed. New York, Crowell, 1960. 435 p. 60–14543 HD8066.D8 1960

"Bibliographical Notes": p. 414–422.

An updated edition of no. 6034 in the 1960 Guide.

2727. Kerr, Clark. Labor and management in industrial society. Garden City, N.Y., Anchor Books [1964] xxvi, 372 p. 64–19279 HD6961.K43

"A401."

Bibliographical footnotes.

Four issues recur in the area of industrial relations: the maintenance of freedom in a machine-dominated society; the achievement of peace among labor, management, and the state; the possibilities for progress in a highly organized and bureaucratized nation; and the role of technology in the interaction of managers and workers. The author discusses manifestations of these questions as they appeared on the American labor front from 1953 to 1961. He aims as well at attaining an overall view of economic development and reverts often to such themes as the impact of industrialization on the course of world history and the wisdom of looking beyond the American system in the 20th century. In Automation and Industrial Relations (New York, Holt, Rinehart, & Winston [1963] 360 p. Modern management series) Edward B. Shils explores the effects of modern technology on jobs and on management and union policies.

2728. Leiserson, William M. American trade union democracy. With a foreword by Sumner H. Slichter. New York, Columbia University Press, 1959. 354 p. 59–8112 HD6508.L43

Bibliographical footnotes.

In his study of the normal operations of trade union governments, the author concentrates on national unions as the power centers of the union movement. He considers the question of whether or not the great influence exerted by the unions in political and economic life is becoming a threat to freedom. To enable the reader to form his own opinion, Leiserson describes in detail the work of the union convention, the division of the executive power, and the operation of the judicial processand draws analogies between union government and the governments of church and state.

2729. Peterson, Florence. American labor unions, what they are and how they work. 2d rev. ed. New York, Harper & Row [1963] 271 p. 63–10629 HD6508.P42 1963

An updated edition of no. 6035 in the 1960 Guide.

2730. Reynolds, Lloyd G. Labor economics and labor relations. 4th ed. Englewood Cliffs, N.J., Prentice-Hall [1964] 568 p. illus. 64–22311 HD4901.R47 1964

Selected readings at the ends of chapters.

An updated edition of no. 6037 in the 1960 Guide. In a similar work, The Labor Sector (New York, McGraw-Hill [1965] 758 p.), Nell W. Chamberlain deals with comparable topics but also devotes a section to the household’s position in the economy. Using labor as a source of income, the family unit regulates the labor supply by deciding the amount of time each member will exchange on the market for remunerated employment. With its wages, the family purchases goods and services; its buying power is thus another influence on the economy. Furthermore, in its strivings for financial security, the household is partly responsible for the rise of the labor unions with the problems and benefits they bring to society.

2731. Taylor, George W., and Frank C. Pierson, eds. New concepts in wage determination. New York, McGraw-Hill, 1957. 336 p. (McGraw-Hill labor management series) 56–11057 HD4909.T3

Bibliographical footnotes.

Realizing the need for a systematic treatment of wage theory, the contributors to this volume wish to establish a common frame of reference. They depart from the traditional view in which wages form an integral part of general economic theory. The editors point out in the preface that "wage theory should be closely, but not exclusively, tied to general theory." Contrary to the usual narrow outlook, maximum gain is not the only goal of economic activity; the men who determine wages operate from several perspectives and seek diversified ends in their economic dealings. In addition, "institutional environment," government intervention in industrial relations, and community attitudes and social customs affect the wage-setting process. Consequently, the editors maintain, the traditional restrictive analysis, which does not take these variables into account, cannot provide a full understanding of wage economics.

2732. Updegraff, Clarence M., and Whitley P. McCoy. Arbitration of labor disputes. 2d ed., by Clarence M. Updegraff. Washington, B [ureau of] N[ational] A[ffairs, 1961] 321 p. 60–16683 KF3424.U5 1961

Bibliographical footnotes.

An updated edition of no. 6058 in the 1960 Guide.

Contents:

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Chicago: "M. Labor: General," A Guide to the Study of the United States of America - Supplement in Oliver H. Orr, Jr. And Roy P. Basler, Eds. A Guide to the Study of the United States of America—Supplement, 1956-1965 (Washington, D.C.: Library of Congress, 1975), Pp.427-428 428. Original Sources, accessed October 3, 2022, http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=LIWMEJBCX4W3X3E.

MLA: . "M. Labor: General." A Guide to the Study of the United States of America - Supplement, in Oliver H. Orr, Jr. And Roy P. Basler, Eds. A Guide to the Study of the United States of America—Supplement, 1956-1965 (Washington, D.C.: Library of Congress, 1975), Pp.427-428, page 428. Original Sources. 3 Oct. 2022. http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=LIWMEJBCX4W3X3E.

Harvard: , 'M. Labor: General' in A Guide to the Study of the United States of America - Supplement. cited in , Oliver H. Orr, Jr. And Roy P. Basler, Eds. A Guide to the Study of the United States of America—Supplement, 1956-1965 (Washington, D.C.: Library of Congress, 1975), Pp.427-428, pp.428. Original Sources, retrieved 3 October 2022, from http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=LIWMEJBCX4W3X3E.