Letters to His Son on the Art of Becoming a Man of the World and a Gentleman, 1759— 65

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Author: Philip Dormer Stanhope

Letter CCLXVII

BLACKHEATH, July 20, 1764.

MY DEAR FRIEND: I have this moment received your letter of the 3d from Prague, but I never received that which you mention from Ratisbon; this made me think you in such rapid motion, that I did not know where to take aim. I now suppose that you are arrived, though not yet settled, at Dresden; your audiences and formalities are, to be sure, over, and that is great ease of mind to you.

I have no political events to acquaint you with; the summer is not the season for them, they ripen only in winter; great ones are expected immediately before the meeting of parliament, but that, you know, is always the language of fears and hopes. However, I rather believe that there will be something patched up between the INS and the OUTS.

The whole subject of conversation, at present, is the death and will of Lord Bath: he has left above twelve hundred thousand pounds in land and money; four hundred thousand pounds in cash, stocks, and mortgages; his own estate, in land, was improved to fifteen thousand pounds a-year, and the Bradford estate, which he ----- is as much; both which, at only fiveand twenty years’ purchase, amount to eight hundred thousand pounds; and all this he has left to his brother, General Pulteney, and in his own disposal, though he never loved him. The legacies he has left are trifling; for, in truth, he cared for nobody: the words GIVE and BEQUEATH were too shocking for him to repeat, and so he left all in one word to his brother. The public, which was long the dupe of his simulation and dissimulation, begins to explain upon him; and draws such a picture of him as I gave you long ago.

Your late secretary has been with me three or four times; he wants something or another, and it seems all one to him what, whether civil or military; in plain English, he wants bread. He has knocked at the doors of some of the ministers, but to no purpose. I wish with all my heart that I could help him: I told him fairly that I could not, but advised him to find some channel to Lord B-----, which, though a Scotchman, he told me he could not. He brought a packet of letters from the office to you, which I made him seal up; and keep it for you, as I suppose it makes up the series of your Ratisbon letters.

As for me, I am just what I was when you left me, that is, nobody. Old age steals upon me insensibly. I grow weak and decrepit, but do not suffer, and so I am content.

Forbes brought me four books of yours, two of which were Bielefeldt’s "Letters," in which, to my knowledge, there are many notorious lies.

Make my compliments to Comte Einsiedel, whom I love and honor much; and so good-night to ’seine Excellentz’.

Now our correspondence may be more regular, and I expect a letter from you every fortnight. I will be regular on my part: but write oftener to your mother, if it be but three lines.

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Chicago: Philip Dormer Stanhope, "Letter CCLXVII," Letters to His Son on the Art of Becoming a Man of the World and a Gentleman, 1759— 65, trans. Paul, Eden, 1865-1944, and Paul, Cedar in Letters to His Son on the Art of Becoming a Man of the World and a Gentleman, 1759—65 Original Sources, accessed June 6, 2023, http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=LK6PL8LRCT7JCVI.

MLA: Stanhope, Philip Dormer. "Letter CCLXVII." Letters to His Son on the Art of Becoming a Man of the World and a Gentleman, 1759— 65, translted by Paul, Eden, 1865-1944, and Paul, Cedar, in Letters to His Son on the Art of Becoming a Man of the World and a Gentleman, 1759—65, Original Sources. 6 Jun. 2023. http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=LK6PL8LRCT7JCVI.

Harvard: Stanhope, PD, 'Letter CCLXVII' in Letters to His Son on the Art of Becoming a Man of the World and a Gentleman, 1759— 65, trans. . cited in , Letters to His Son on the Art of Becoming a Man of the World and a Gentleman, 1759—65. Original Sources, retrieved 6 June 2023, from http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=LK6PL8LRCT7JCVI.