Week Ending Friday, March 21, 2003

Contents:
Author: George W. Bush  | Date: March 15, 2003

The President’s Radio Address,
March 15, 2003

Good morning. This weekend marks a bitter anniversary for the people of Iraq. Fifteen years ago, Saddam Hussein’s regime ordered a chemical weapons attack on a village in Iraq called Halabja. With that single order, the regime killed thousands of Iraq’s Kurdish citizens. Whole families died while trying to flee clouds of nerve and mustard agents descending from the sky. Many who managed to survive still suffer from cancer, blindness, respiratory diseases, miscarriages, and severe birth defects among their children.

The chemical attack on Halabja, just one of 40 targeted at Iraq’s own people, provided a glimpse of the crimes Saddam Hussein is willing to commit and the kind of threat he now presents to the entire world. He is among history’s cruelest dictators, and he is arming himself with the world’s most terrible weapons.

Recognizing this threat, the United Nations Security Council demanded that Saddam Hussein give up all his weapons of mass destruction as a condition for ending the Gulf war 12 years ago. The Security Council has repeated this demand numerous times and warned that Iraq faces serious consequences if it fails to comply. Iraq has responded with defiance, delay, and deception.

The United States, Great Britain, and Spain continue to work with fellow members of the U.N. Security Council to confront this common danger. We have seen far too many instances in the past decade, from Bosnia to Rwanda to Kosovo, where the failure of the Security Council to act decisively has led to tragedy. And we must recognize that some threats are so grave and their potential consequences so terrible that they must be removed, even if it requires military force.

As diplomatic efforts continue, we must never lose sight of the basic facts about the regime of Baghdad. We know from recent history that Saddam Hussein is a reckless dictator who has twice invaded his neighbors without provocation, wars that led to death and suffering on a massive scale. We know from human rights groups that dissidents in Iraq are tortured, imprisoned, and sometimes just disappear; their hands, feet, and tongues are cut off; their eyes are gouged out; and female relatives are raped in their presence.

As the Nobel laureate and Holocaust survivor Elie Wiesel said this week, "We have a moral obligation to intervene where evil is in control. Today, that place is Iraq."

We know from prior weapons inspections that Saddam has failed to account for vast quantities of biological and chemical agents, including mustard agent, botulinum toxin, and sarin, capable of killing millions of people. We know the Iraqi regime finances and sponsors terror. And we know the regime has plans to place innocent people around military installations to act as human shields.

There is little reason to hope that Saddam Hussein will disarm. If force is required to disarm him, the American people can know that our Armed Forces have been given every tool and every resource to achieve victory. The people of Iraq can know that every effort will be made to spare innocent life and to help Iraq recover from three decades of totalitarian rule. And plans are in place to provide Iraqis with massive amounts of food, as well as medicine and other essential supplies, in the event of hostilities.

Crucial days lie ahead for the free nations of the world. Governments are now showing whether their stated commitments to liberty and security are words alone or convictions they’re prepared to act upon. And for the Government of the United States and the coalition we lead, there is no doubt: We will confront a growing danger, to protect ourselves, to remove a patron and protector of terror, and to keep the peace of the world.

Thank you for listening.

Note: The address was recorded at 10:21 a.m. on March 14 in the Cabinet Room at the White House for broadcast at 10:06 a.m. on March 15. The transcript was made available by the Office of the Press Secretary on March 14 but was embargoed for release until the broadcast. In his remarks, the President referred to President Saddam Hussein of Iraq. The Office of the Press Secretary also released a Spanish language transcript of this address.

Contents:

Related Resources

None available for this document.

Download Options


Title: Week Ending Friday, March 21, 2003

Select an option:

*Note: A download may not start for up to 60 seconds.

Email Options


Title: Week Ending Friday, March 21, 2003

Select an option:

Email addres:

*Note: It may take up to 60 seconds for for the email to be generated.

Chicago: George W. Bush, "The President’s Radio Address, March 15, 2003," Week Ending Friday, March 21, 2003 in United States. Executive Office of the President, Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents, Week Ending Friday, March 21, 2003 (Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 2003), 39:329-330 329–330. Original Sources, accessed July 6, 2022, http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=N9SM318VQUJWJAI.

MLA: Bush, George W. "The President’s Radio Address, March 15, 2003." Week Ending Friday, March 21, 2003, in United States. Executive Office of the President, Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents, Week Ending Friday, March 21, 2003 (Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 2003), 39:329-330, pp. 329–330. Original Sources. 6 Jul. 2022. http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=N9SM318VQUJWJAI.

Harvard: Bush, GW, 'The President’s Radio Address, March 15, 2003' in Week Ending Friday, March 21, 2003. cited in , United States. Executive Office of the President, Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents, Week Ending Friday, March 21, 2003 (Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 2003), 39:329-330, pp.329–330. Original Sources, retrieved 6 July 2022, from http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=N9SM318VQUJWJAI.