Travels in Africa


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I remember [says the African traveler Junker] how some A-Barmbo were disgusted at the smell of some genuine old Edam (Dutch) cheese, of which I had eaten a few scraps, and gave out that the white people eat "the foulest muck." Many smells affect them differently from us, and they turn with loathing from eau de cologne, for instance, and from scented soap.1

The American Indians had no milk-giving animals and have never borrowed the milk habit from the whites. "It is with the greatest difficulty," says Wissler, "that our reservation Indians can be led to care for milk cows."

1Junker, W.J.n/an/an/an/a, , 3: 101.

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Chicago: Travels in Africa in Primitive Behavior: An Introduction to the Social Sciences, ed. Thomas, William I. (New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc., 1937), Original Sources, accessed July 16, 2019, http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=P5Y962GWTICFPWJ.

MLA: . Travels in Africa, Vol. 3, in Primitive Behavior: An Introduction to the Social Sciences, edited by Thomas, William I., New York, McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc., 1937, Original Sources. 16 Jul. 2019. www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=P5Y962GWTICFPWJ.

Harvard: , Travels in Africa. cited in 1937, Primitive Behavior: An Introduction to the Social Sciences, ed. , McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc., New York. Original Sources, retrieved 16 July 2019, from http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=P5Y962GWTICFPWJ.