A Guide to the Study of the United States of America

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Louisiana

4100. Louisiana. Legislative Council. Louisiana; its history, people, government and economy. Baton Rouge, 1955. 285 p. (Its Research study no. 7) 56–62531 JK4771.A32, no. 7

"This book presents information concerning the history, the people, the government, and the economy of Louisiana in brief, narrative form supplemented by valuable statistical data, thus making available in one place the highlights of the development of Louisiana." Originating in an idea of Senator Robert A. Ainsworth, chairman of the Legislative Council, and compiled by the Council staff under the direction of Emmett Assert, it incorporates information provided by twelve departments of the Louisiana Government. Among the subjects treated by the 23 chapters are "Elections," "Louisiana Local Government," "Fairs and Festivals," "Highways," and "State Revenues and Expenditures." The introduction notes seven specific State trends by comparing figures of 1939 with those of 1953.

4101. Tinker, Edward Larocque. Creole city: its past and its people. New York, Longmans, Green, 1953. 359 p. illus. 53–5615 F379.N5T53

Born in New York City, the author, after his marriage to Frances McKee of New Orleans in 1916, became interested in his wife’s hometown, took up writing as a career, and has become an outstanding collector and authority on the French period and the French language in Louisiana and old New Orleans. Mr. Tinker has twice received the French Academy’s Gold Medal for his writings in this field. In this book materials that have appeared in various periodicals are brought together to illustrate the amalgamation of the native population and the American influx which took place after 1803 and "the way in which each has modified the thoughts and habits of the other" so as to develop a new manner of life and to settle down into "a perfect union." With infectious enthusiasm for his subject, the author describes the picturesque characters of the port city—the French, the Cajuns, the free men and women of color—the succulence of Creole dishes, and the gaiety of the Mardi Gras in an informal history of "the City that care forgot."

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Chicago: "Louisiana," A Guide to the Study of the United States of America in Donald H. Mugridge, Blanche P. McCrum, and Roy P. Basler, a Guide to the Study of the United States of America (Washington, D.C.: Library of Congress, 1960), P.499 Original Sources, accessed August 17, 2019, http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=PX1MFDGDYTID3N1.

MLA: . "Louisiana." A Guide to the Study of the United States of America, in Donald H. Mugridge, Blanche P. McCrum, and Roy P. Basler, a Guide to the Study of the United States of America (Washington, D.C.: Library of Congress, 1960), P.499, Original Sources. 17 Aug. 2019. www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=PX1MFDGDYTID3N1.

Harvard: , 'Louisiana' in A Guide to the Study of the United States of America. cited in , Donald H. Mugridge, Blanche P. McCrum, and Roy P. Basler, a Guide to the Study of the United States of America (Washington, D.C.: Library of Congress, 1960), P.499. Original Sources, retrieved 17 August 2019, from http://www.originalsources.com/Document.aspx?DocID=PX1MFDGDYTID3N1.